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Court rejection of all petitions signals Mubarak may be let off: FJP lawyer

A legal representative of the Muslim Brotherhood's party decries the court's rejection of any petitions as a signal Mubarak et al might be let off

Ahram Online, Saturday 8 Jun 2013
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The Muslim Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice Party lawyer Abdel-Moneim Abdel-Maqsoud denounces Saturday's Cairo Criminal Court rection of any of the plaintiffs' petitions in the retrial of ousted president Hosni Mubarak and his aides.

"Today's decision is shocking," Abdel-Maqsoud told Aswat Masriya news website. "It signals that Mubarak, his sons and aides could be on their way to escaping punishment."

The Cairo Criminal Court adjourned the multiple-plaintiff trial that includes former president Hosni Mubarak, his sons Gamal and Alaa as well as former interior minister Habib El-Adly and his six aides to Monday.

The court explained in the ruling that they did not accept the plaintiffs' requests for motions because they need to refer them to the courts of proper jurisdiction.

Abdel-Maqsoud added that the plaintiffs' lawyers will convene soon to discuss a response to the court's decision and study the possibility of appeal.

Mubarak, who received a life sentence in June 2012 for "failing to protect" unarmed anti-regime protesters during Egypt's 18-day popular uprising in early 2011, was granted a retrial in January due to procedural irregularities in the initial trial.

Mubarak, together with El-Adly, are accused of killing demonstrators during the 18 days which led to the former president’s overthrow. The ex-autocrat, together with his two sons, also face accusations of using their former positions to illicitly expand their fortunes.

On 19 April, the Muslim Brotherhood stage a mass protest calling for 'a 'purge' of the judiciary. Supporters of president Mohamed Morsi, who hails from the group, accuse the judiciary of blocking vital reforms and being loyal to former president Hosni Mubarak.

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