Last Update 17:30
Egypt's new interim president: Judge Adly Mansour
Ahram Online provides brief biography of High Constitutional Court (HCC) head Adly Mohamed Mansour, who will hold executive authority until new presidential elections
Sayed Gamal El-Din , Wednesday 3 Jul 2013
Share/Bookmark
Views: 10617
Adly Mansour
The head of Egypt's High Constitutional Adly Mansour

Judge Adly Mahmoud Mansour, 67, head of Egypt's High Constitutional Court (HCC) – who is now Egypt's transitional president after former Muslim Brotherhood president Mohamed Morsi was ousted after mass protests this week – was appointed head of the HCC in May. His term officially started on 30 June after former head Judge Maher El-Beheiry's reached retirement age.

Mansour was appointed in line with a new 2011 law, which stipulated that HCC heads should be appointed from within the court system. For 20 years, the HCC head was chosen from outside the constitutional court. Mansour has served as deputy head of the HCC since 1992. 

Mansour helped draft the supervision law for the presidential elections that brought Morsi to power in 2012, which included setting a legal timeframe for electoral campaigning.

Born in December 1945, Mansour graduated law school in 1967 and worked at Egypt's State Council – which has jurisdiction over the administrative court system when the government is involved – before joining the HCC.





Short link:

 

Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
Ahram Online welcomes readers' comments on all issues covered by the site, along with any criticisms and/or corrections. Readers are asked to limit their feedback to a maximum of 1000 characters (roughly 50 words). All comments/criticisms will, however, be subject to the following code
  • We will not publish comments which contain rude or abusive language, libelous statements, slander and personal attacks against any person/s.
  • We will not publish comments which contain racist remarks or any kind of racial or religious incitement against any group of people, in Egypt or outside it.
  • We welcome criticism of our reports and articles but we will not publish personal attacks, slander or fabrications directed against our reporters and contributing writers.
  • We reserve the right to correct, when at all possible, obvious errors in spelling and grammar. However, due to time and staffing constraints such corrections will not be made across the board or on a regular basis.
6



Antonio Borelli
04-07-2013 02:05am
10-
19+
Prayers for all Egyptians
My prayers for all Egyptians as they struggle peacefully to gain a centrist secular government able to represent all Egyptians equally, and bring the prosperity to bear, which is so close for the nation. Antonio USA
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
5



Greek Tragedy
04-07-2013 01:45am
40-
26+
Return of the Pharoah
The Kemalists are back. the ghost of megalomaniac Nasser, Western lackey Sada'at and arch criminal Mubarak is triumphant. Because the military generals were not purged and the the deep sate dismantled, democracy has failed in Egypt. Street power politics is fascism. It took military power and street power fascism to remove an elected president, first in the history of Egypt. Secularists could not stomach it. Copts and Al-Azhar were co-opted. the tragedy of Egypt is its narrow vision, the proto-Pahraohs are back in business after just one year of democratic rule., the TV stations are closed and there is fear in the street. Military and police has already killed many and imprisoned unknown number. Morsi should be saluted he held on to the last without any support from the security establishment, police or army. All those were instruments of repression which were meant to fail Morsi's administration. Egypt welcome to your dark night.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
4



Miguel
04-07-2013 01:41am
3-
13+
Friend of Egypt
Democracy isn't easy, but it is worth the struggle. Egypt is a great country with millenia of history, you can make this work. Be good to each other, you may get to vote for each other soon!
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
3



Ahmed
04-07-2013 01:33am
16-
17+
Sad day for Egypt
We will see one year from now how the situation on the ground will look like. I doubted there will be any real democracy in the near future. Back to military rule in Egypt for another forty years. Mark my word.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
2



Ahmed
03-07-2013 11:26pm
23-
31+
Judiciary & Millitary
Juiciary & Millitary will now rule the Egypt...Will the Judges now explain how they can assume executive powers..? What law and constitution allow the Millitry to remove an elected president and give the executive powers to Judiciary..? First thing of the militry coup to off air the opposition chanels so wheere are now champions of the freedmom of press and expression ..? lets see next couple of days....God save Egypt
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
Muhamed
04-07-2013 01:19am
417-
142+
It was not a coup d'etat
Congratulation to good people of Egypt and patriot army coup d'etat usually made by opposition army but this president must leave without any objection because he was trying to Islamize the country this was not what people put him in power god bless Egypt and great people
1



Dhirendra singh
03-07-2013 11:13pm
6-
52+
Best Wishes
I wish all People of Misr A great and beautiful country all the best for their efforts in bringing the will of the people as the supreme authority. It is sad that democratically elected leader has to go - never ideal. Future leaders must remember that they are only agents of people and their masters This second revolution may not be the last but I believe eventually your country will find the right solution Good luck D singh Essex UK
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
Greek Tragedy
04-07-2013 01:46am
76-
169+
Pleased Hindu
Hindu is pleased , becasue it is loss of a democratic goverenment in a Muslim country.

© 2010 Ahram Online. Advertising