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Pro-Morsi rallies no longer acceptable: Egyptian cabinet
Cabinet extends mandate to interior ministry to confront 'acts of terrorism and road-blocking', says pro-Morsi sit-ins at Rabaa and Nahda Square 'threat to national security'
Ahram Online, Wednesday 31 Jul 2013
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Mohamed Ibrahim
Mohamed Ibrahim, interior minister of Egypt (Photo: Reuters)

Egypt's cabinet says it will take "all legal measures necessary to confront acts of terrorism and road-blocking" in an apparent warning to supporters of deposed Islamist president Mohamed Morsi who have been camping out in two Cairo sit-ins since the president's ouster.

"Based on the mandate given by the people to the state, and in preservation of the country's higher interest, the cabinet has delegated the interior ministry to proceed with all legal measures to confront acts of terrorism and road-blocking," said interim information minister Dorreya Sharaf El-Din in a cabinet statement Wednesday evening.

"The cabinet has reviewed the country's security situation and has concluded that the dangerous situation in Rabaa and Nahda Squares, including the terrorist acts and road-blocking that has occurred, is no longer acceptable as it constitutes a threat to the country's national security," El-Din added.

Egypt's interior minister Mohamed Ibrahim announced on 27 July that the police and the army were working in coordination to discuss a suitable day for dispersing the two pro-Morsi sit-ins, which hold tens of thousands of protesters.

Ibrahim's statement came following mass demonstrations in Cairo and other cities responding to army chief Abdel Fattah El-Sisi's call for Egyptians to take to the street on 26 July and give the army a "popular mandate to confront terrorism and violence." The Egyptian presidency later accused Morsi supporters of orchestrating organised attacks against the opposing protesters.

In the hours following Friday's protests, police clashed with Morsi supporters near the Rabaa Al-Adawiya Square sit-in, where at least 80 protesters were killed.

Supporters of the elected Morsi – deposed by El-Sisi on 3 July following nationwide protests – continue to press for his reinstatement through demonstrations that have often turned into violent clashes with police forces and unknown assailants.

The Muslim Brotherhood, from which Morsi hails, has rejected political negotiations, insisting that 3 July was a coup d'état and that Morsi must be reinstated before any dialogue takes place.



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Dust Bunny
01-08-2013 01:45pm
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7+
Exhausting
Can people eat "protests"? Can we convert "protests" into money? Do protests teach morals, values and decent behavior patterns to our children? No, no and no. So meanwhile people are practicing the freedom of speech and freedom of gathering, let's also do our duties to BUILD. No, governments actually can't do all the work instead of us, sadly. We have to be active as well. It's high time to start doing instead of moaning and talking. It's impossible to satisfy 82 million people, does this mean that Egypt can never move forward? Hating is so very easy...
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11



Jon
01-08-2013 12:02pm
9-
18+
So one should shoot them?
Demonstrations from the party that won the two last elections in Egypt are no longer "accepted"? So what are you going to do to brothers that still demonstrate? Shoot them?
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10



Eric
01-08-2013 09:40am
6-
23+
Threat to National Security???????
It is shocking to see the double standards used in dealing with Tahrir Square and Itehadia Presidential Palace protests on the one hand, which are being protected, and Rabaa Al-Adaweya and Nahda Square protests, which are being falsely accused of becoming a threat to national security. National security requires that the army should do its duties at the country’s borders, not the elimination of demonstrators in peaceful street protests by force. This "cabinet" decision is a gross violation of peoples democratic human rights to protest. Egypt is gone back to its dark days of tyranny, repression and oppression and the whole world is watching!!!
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9



Farid
01-08-2013 09:20am
19-
8+
Dissociative identity disorder
We love army! We hate army! Army good! Army bad! Army help us! Army go away! With all respect but its classic example of Dissociative identity disorder. And on top of all, there was a reason why MB's were kept away from power since 1954, last year show it clearly.
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8



Euel
01-08-2013 06:58am
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11+
"National security" of Egypt is always in the tips of the authorities Nose!
Whenever pro-Morsi protesters march, it is national security....whenever Nile is discussed, it is national security,....whenever the Israel is talked it is National security,....what does that mean? Is Egypt always on a hot iron? Is Egyptian authorities with such only phrases so that they can get the mob involved for their political means......Better for Egypt not to use the phrase in every silly political process as National security is all about existence!!
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7



sabine
01-08-2013 06:44am
22-
16+
Alternative
No European Government will accept such sit-in as its a major intervention to residents life there. They do not have rights??? How it come that all these foreign governments push for tolerance to these sit-ins while they would never accept as there are clear rules to any demonstration, which does not allow major disturbance to public life and destruction of private and state owned property. Why does the government offer them a place somewhere else where they cannot disturb anyone?? Of course we know that they will not accept, but then they cannot oppose of being removed. In the end they have to accept now that the majority of Egypt doesnt want Morsi and MB!!!!
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6



Samantha Criscione
01-08-2013 03:43am
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18+
The people in Rabaa are not "protesters." They don't hold "rallies."
There are Reuters photos on the Internet showing the so-called protesters at Rabaa, some of them armed with long steel clubs, often the same length and color, wearing identical helmets. Those that are so armed have backpacks on their backs, but not the unarmed ones. What is in those backpacks? More weapons? These are militia, not protesters. There are videos showing them drilling, jogging in place to commands from what are obviously their officers. Tortured bodies have been found near Rabaa. Residents interviewed by Ahram tell of being terrified by these crazy-acting, violent, thieving fanatics. Why does the world call them "protesters"? Why should anyone believe Brotherhood claims that they are peaceful, just expressing their views -- in night marches? -- and that they are victims of police violence? This Rabaa live-in is a staging point for terrorist attacks on opponents, and for creating incidents to give Western powers the public opinion support to make demands on Egypt. Coddling these clerical fascists -- who have been indoctrinated to believe they have the right to rule in the name of God -- can only backfire.--Samantha Criscione
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5



Trudy Willis
31-07-2013 10:45pm
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57+
Pro Morsi Rallies no longer acceptable
I think it's now crucial for the Brotherhood to join in the political negotiations with Egypt's new Cabinet. Anything else just does not make sense to me. If Morsi backers are convinced that they represent over 50% of the electorate then what are they then worried about? What I question after living 15 years in the Middle East as a Canadian, with the last year in Cairo, how is it that the Brotherhood would believe it can continue to stand up against the Egyptian Military? When I drove by the huge ports on the Suez a few months ago I was so impressed with how the Egyptian Military organized the many ships passing through the Canal. Also the goods either passing through or staying behind were also obviously closely monitored. From my perspective it did not seem that Morsi and his "elected government" had much to do with any of this.
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Sajjad Saleem
01-08-2013 08:59am
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142+
Fool's Paradise
I think, you are drawing up a fool's paradise. Didnt MB supporters won three elections, parliamnetary, presidential and and then constitution? Who will guarantee their mandate will not be stolen again? Also, how do you think, the elections will be fair by the people who are killing hundreds of MB supporters day by day? Actually the thing is, democracy for liberals is only acceptable when MB does not win.
abdulrahman
01-08-2013 07:42am
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Who Can Trust A Gang Of FRAUDSTERS
Very nice of Trudy Willis for the above comments but he has come to the sense that the coup was not a democracy. Now those who had forced out an elected President will at all cost not allow the MB to win in the future elections. If they can stage a coup and then killing hundreds of protesters, rigging and cheating in elections should be very minor breaches. The best for MB is to stand fast and whatever happens should not join the coming elections as they are bound to lose heavily by cheating.
Ali
01-08-2013 07:08am
1-
85+
Pro Morsi Rallies no longer acceptable
Dear Trudy, MB politics or its performance is questionable there's no doubt, but we have to first make the rule and principles. Is the Army has the right to overthrow an elected president before it's constitutional tenure on request of opposition..? Can Army who are paid public taxes (public servents) can rule over public..? If we justify the Amy action today then it won 't be a precedent to over throw next elected president on same way even after six months..? Does Army has any legal right to suspend a constitution that was approved by a majority public vote..? Why the Army and Liberals are worried if they have 33 million supporters/backer to go to the referrendum to win the elections,to amend the constitution to impeach the president, to form their own government, why they need Army tanks to form the cabinet..? Why they are afraid from "few thousand" prostesters while they were protesting freely whole year against Morsy..? Your suggestions are seem like to accept the law of Jungle wh
4



Ejal
31-07-2013 10:40pm
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A dying military regime
This sounds like desperation of military regime just before its demise.
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Mike
01-08-2013 07:10am
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124+
More like....
This is the islamists last chance before they are rendered null and void.
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Modern_Humaniora
31-07-2013 08:32pm
24-
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Mohamed Ibrahim
Probably the most despised man in the world today!
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