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One million pro-Morsi protesters, 30 million opponents in 1432 July demos: Democracy Index
The Democracy Index publishes an analysis of the pattern of demonstrations in Egypt in July, predicting further violence if a political solution is not reached
Ahram Online , Thursday 1 Aug 2013
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Mohammed Morsi
July 26, 2013 file photo released by the Egyptian army, opponents of Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi demonstrate at Tahrir Square in Cairo (Photo: AP)

The Democracy Index, a report on Egyptian protests released on Thursday by the Cairo-based organisation the International Development Center, stated that there were 1432 demonstrations in July, with an average of 46 demonstrations a day and two demonstrations every hour.

The Index discussed the issue of contested numbers in protests nationwide. It stated that more than 30 million protesters participated in nationwide protests against Mohamed Morsi's rule and the Muslim Brotherhood, from which Morsi hails, demanding their fall and supporting the transitional period.

On the other hand, the Index stated that less than one million protesters nationwide took to the streets in support of Morsi, denouncing what they describe as a military coup on constitutional legitimacy.

The first three days of July, according to the Index, witnessed a sum of 420 protests that ended in the toppling of Morsi from power along with his Cabinet. The numbers of demonstrations then fluctuated throughout the month, with the least number of demonstrations on 10 July, with only 12 demonstrations nationwide, and the most demonstrations on 1 July, where 147 demonstrations took to the streets across the country.

The Democracy Index concludes that Morsi opponents outnumber his supporters by 30 to one. However, despite what the Index dubs a "vast difference" in numbers, both Morsi opponents and supporters managed to organise almost equal numbers of demonstrations.

In July, there were 24 different forms of protesting witnessed: the top three, in terms of frequency, were marches, where 582 marches were organised, representing 40.89 percent of all forms of protest; demonstrations, where 264 demonstrations represented 18.55 percent of all protests; and roadblocks, at 8.29 percent of all protests.

Cairo took first place among Egyptian governorates for most protests, witnessing 19.74 percent of total demonstrations. Gharbia governorate came second with 6.76 percent, while Giza came third with 6.69 percent. Surprisingly, Alexandria governorate was not in the top three places — it came fifth, witnessing 5.83 percent of the nation's protests.

Reasons for protesting were divided into two: protesting for political and civil rights increased 60 percent from June to 89.50 percent in July, while protesting for economic and social rights marked 10.50 percent of total demonstrations, including denouncing power cuts and water shortages.

In the categories of the protestors, 37.66 percent were categorised under political Islamist currents, 27.19 percent as people and citizens, and 16.2 percent political activists. The least percentage went to intellectuals, at 0.08 percent.

The Index noted the emergence of "dangerous" developments in protests, including civilians trying to confront other protesters, which is attributed by the Index to a lack of security forces on the ground, and also the use of weapons by Morsi loyalists. The Index also noted the use of children by pro-Morsi protesters, the same observation made by UNICEF Tuesday, decrying the use of children and indicating that such use can have "long-lasting and devastating physical and psychological impacts on children."

The Index noted an unprecedented general propensity to use violence in protests.

Egyptian labour movements also organised tens of demonstrations, according to the Democracy Index.

Labour demonstrations have called for better work conditions. Some 38 demonstrations were organised in July by factory and company workers; 36 by workers in the educational sector; 31 by the workers in governmental sectors; 18 in the security sector; and 16 by workers in the medical sectors.

The Index predicted an increase in the use of violence by pro-Morsi demonstrators, to the extent of "terrorist attacks" if a political solution is not reached.

Continued tensions are also predicted between people and protesters, even if protests are not for political reasons, which might endanger the "right to organise" in Egypt.

In addition, if security forces do not adopt international standards in dispersing the pro-Morsi Rabaa Al-Adawiya sit-in, there will be disputes and conflicts on domestic, regional and international levels, the Index noted.

The Index recommends adopting lawful means to disperse pro-Morsi sit-ins, so Egypt can be an example of freedom and democracy, and not return to the repressive and violent state it was.





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15



AmericanMuse
02-08-2013 07:43pm
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17+
Comments Delayed
Why does Ahram online not publish comments for more that 24 hours after this deceptive article appeared? By that time readers have moved on and the overwhelmingly negative response to this article is not noticed. This is very inconsiderate toward your readers. Comments should be published promptly.
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14



yoosuf
02-08-2013 08:06am
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21+
insulting
A shameless biased analysis insulting the intelligence of its readers. I am surprised why the intelligentsia of the great Egyptian nation has fallen to this low level. Yoosuf, Colombo, Sri Lanka
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13



hajrudin
02-08-2013 04:45am
12-
16+
ahram
where is my comment. i said not 30million but 75million protested. just a propaganda. mobody believe their lies. shame on them. accorsing to scientists circa 1.5million protested not more.
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12



abdulrahman
02-08-2013 01:47am
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21+
Al Ahram Now Is The Same As Under Mubarak
You are now back to telling lies as you did prior to and during the anti Mubarak revolution. You are really making your readers vomit at the report of 30 million Egyptians were out on the streets against Morsi. Please strengthen you back, stand straight and walk with the pride of an honest person. Stop bullshitting because it make you dirty and repugnant. The news media will only paint an untruth but will not have the affect the course of the peoples' struggle for freedom, justice and democracy. Dear Journalists!!! Don't be influenced by the fear, favor, power nor by your own bias. Report truly and honestly.
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11



AmericanMuse
01-08-2013 09:49pm
14-
21+
Cooked Numbers
There is no credibility to these anti-Morsi numbers. In the last (and only) democratic elections held in Egypt, President Morsi won outright.
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10



couphater
01-08-2013 09:01pm
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19+
This general went mad
AlAhram General/field marshal can't wait to celeberate the coup. If what they write is correct ( which it's not at all ) it means where there is one brother/islamist there are 30 seculars/copt. It is a fact MB a lone will make at least 50% of Egypt. This means they are 40 to 50 millions. If we accept the ratio 0f 34 to 1 it means Egypt's secular population will exceed that of china's or Indian population. Read a peace of article in Fox News or AlJazeera regarding inflated numbers. Tahrir Must be so big and not only that but it's elastic.. Islam is the Solution and down with the generals.
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9



Asmaa
01-08-2013 08:30pm
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14+
Reference?
I am unable to find ANY document online referencing these figures except in Egyptian news, repeating the same figures and "source" over and over. Please provide a link to the original document this article is referring to.
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8



Tomas Solfaro
01-08-2013 07:38pm
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Lies and more lies destroy democracy
Elitist Pro-Coup demostrators are lying about the numbers of their supporters in the streets. In fact their are many. many times more AntiCoup demonstrators in the streets. At most a million people came out into the streets on 30 July to protest the government of Mohammed Morsi. These demonstators were mad at the pro-poor policies that President Morsi ijmplemented at the expense of the elite clases in Egypt that are maily alligned with foriegn interests. Every day for almost a month now, millions--many more times than the pro-coup demonstrations--have demonstrated against the military coup that was staged by greedy elites trying to stop the Egyptian President of the people. Even today their are more people at the Nasr City sitin than at any one time in Tahir Square. But most importantly democracy, international law and the people of Egypt are on the side of the AntiCoup demonstrators.
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7



medo
01-08-2013 07:02pm
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2+
LOL
numbers speak volumes!!!!
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6



mohammed moiduddin
01-08-2013 06:51pm
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20+
Anti morsi article
Try to be even handed. Why did morsi win the elections then?
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