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NSF rejects drafted amended parliamentary articles in Constitution
The NSF declares that return to the individual candidacy system in parliamentary elections will bring back the regimes ousted by the Egyptian people
Ahram Online , Thursday 22 Aug 2013
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The National Salvation Front (NSF) declared its rejection of the draft amendments of the parliamentary election articles in the 2012 constitution.

In a joint press conference on Wednesday with Ahmed El Muslimany, the interim president's media advisor, Siyad El Badawy, the leader of Al Wafd Party, which is a member of the front, declared the its rejection of the amendments proposed by the 10-member committee in the parliamentary elections articles in the 2012 constitution.

"There is a constitutional contradiction between the individual candidacy electoral system where a semi-parliamentary system is adopted but the majority party has the right to form the cabinet," the Al Wafd Party leader stated.

"The individual candidacy parliamentary electoral system will result in reproducing regimes that were ousted in two revolutions and will waste votes as the winner only needs 50% to win," El Badawy said.

The leader of Al Wafd Party also added that the individual candidacy system allowed the use of money in elections, and had asked Al Muslimany to convey the National Salvation Front's objections to interim president Adly Mansour.

"It will not allow for better representation of youth, women or Christians in the parliament," he added.

In the 2012 constitution the electoral parliamentary system adopted was a mix between the individual candidacy and party list system.





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MPA
23-08-2013 12:22am
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HA! And now you see...
you were played the fool.
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Fritz German
22-08-2013 11:46pm
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What one should think about!
The most basic human right: "All persons are equal before the law, regardless of any distinguishing features." It does not prevent discriminatory laws. But if someone feels discriminated, one can use the legal process to the Constitutional Court. Legislation is complicated. It could happen to anyone. How can Parliament dismiss an elected president? In Germany, the Parliament elects the Chancellor indirectly and may at any time elect a new chancellor. In the U.S. there are impeachment proceedings. Germany after Hitler put a constitutional amendment against dictators: Against anyone who undertakes to eliminate democracy, all Germans have the right to resist, if no other remedy is possible. electoral law: majoritarian or proportional representation In the majority voting over 67% of the seats in parliament can be achieved with a 40% approval rating and amend the constitution. See currently in Hungary. In Germany, it would have been possible 7 times in 60 years, if they do not have had proportional representation. How do Egyptians prevent the dominance of a minority? In a democracy, you can vote for someone who wants to be a dictator, as seen. Therefore, one must make democracy strong and durable with a good constitution!
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neil
22-08-2013 12:57pm
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correction
Mr el Badawy is correct about everything, except that a party only needs 50%, a majority, to win a seat, they in fact only need a plurality, the most of any party. Now, in a two-party system, which inevitably forms under this system of voting, of course a party needs over half the votes to win. but in the last Egypt elections, where several parties compete, a 'plurality' could be 10%, plus if turnout is half, then they only need 5% of eligible voters. and this is not just 'theory' I can give you examples of real cases. may I add, the idea of 'independent' candidates is all theory. in practice, not 1% of elected members of this system are independent, virtually all belong to a party
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