Last Update 15:14
Dozens of crocodiles stolen from Egypt's Lake Nasser
Spike in poaching causes crocodile population to decline by half in Egypt's largest man-made lake
Ahram Online, MENA, Wednesday 25 Sep 2013
Share/Bookmark
Views: 1423
Crocodile
A pet crocodile in a Nubian home in Upper Egypt (Photo: Mai Shaheen)

Crocodile numbers in Egypt's largest man-made lake have slumped dramatically due to illegal overfishing and poaching amid the current security vacuum, a nature reserve official has said.

Studies show crocodile numbers in Lake Nasser have dropped by half over the past few years, Mohamed Ezzat of the Nature Reserve Authority in Upper Egypt said.

Large crocodiles are captured because their skin fetches very high prices, Ezzat said.

Only 41 crocodiles were found recently in Khor Korosko, part of the lake where crocodiles live, compared to 81 three years ago, he added.

Lake Nasser is a huge reservoir in southern Egypt, created when the Aswan High Dam was built in 1970. It is one of the largest man-made lakes in Africa, and is famous for its varieties of fish, birds, mammals and reptiles.

Fishing in the lake is banned pursuant to the CITES agreement (the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) that Egypt recently signed.

 



Search Keywords:


Short link:

 

Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
Ahram Online welcomes readers' comments on all issues covered by the site, along with any criticisms and/or corrections. Readers are asked to limit their feedback to a maximum of 4000 characters (roughly 200 words). All comments/criticisms will, however, be subject to the following code
  • We will not publish comments which contain rude or abusive language, libelous statements, slander and personal attacks against any person/s.
  • We will not publish comments which contain racist remarks or any kind of racial or religious incitement against any group of people, in Egypt or outside it.
  • We welcome criticism of our reports and articles but we will not publish personal attacks, slander or fabrications directed against our reporters and contributing writers.
  • We reserve the right to correct, when at all possible, obvious errors in spelling and grammar. However, due to time and staffing constraints such corrections will not be made across the board or on a regular basis.
1



Richard
22-10-2013 06:21am
0-
0+
Sad
In a country of amazing cultural heritage, it is a shame that it's natural heritage is not given as much respect.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment

© 2010 Ahram Online. Advertising