Last Update 16:14
Egyptian political and religious figures condemn Warraq church attack
Maspero Youth Union calls for a protest Tuesday against the government; Salafist Nour Party and Al-Gamaa Al-Islamiya condemn the attack
Ahram Online , Monday 21 Oct 2013
Share/Bookmark
Views: 1896
Al-Warraq Church
Egyptians gather at a Coptic Christian church in Al-Warraq late Sunday 20 Oct, 2013 after a gunman on motorcycle opened fire at a wedding ceremony, killing four and wounding dozens (Photo: AP)

Several political and religious figures have condemned the shooting at Al-Warraq's Keniset Al-'Adra (The Church of the Virgin Mary) late Sunday that resulted in the death of four victims and the injury of dozens after a man randomly fired 15 bullets at a wedding ceremony before fleeing the scene.

Interim Egyptian Prime Minister Hazem El-Beblawi denounced the attack late on Sunday, describing the shooting of innocent people during their participation at a wedding ceremony as a "cowardly criminal act" in a short press statement.

Two girls -- one aged 12 and the other eight -- were among the dead, in addition to a man and a woman, a security source told Ahram Online. Eighteen others were injured, some of whom are in critical condition.

Despite El-Beblawi's condemnation, the Maspero Youth Union (a grass-roots Christian rights group) held the prime minister and his government responsible for the attack.

In a press statement issued on Monday, the Christian youth group condemned the government's failure to protect Christians during the attacks that followed the 14 August police dispersal of two large pro-Morsi protest camps -- including the latest shooting at Al-Warraq church.

The Maspero Youth Union has called for a protest next Tuesday in front of the cabinet headquarters demanding the trial of the minister of interior for his late response to the ongoing attacks against Christians.

Al-Azhar Grand Imam Sheikh Ahmed El-Tayeb condemned the attack in a press statement issued earlier on Monday.

"It is a criminal attack against religion as well as morals," said the head of Egypt's leading Islamic institution, who also expressed his personal condolences to the families of the victims.

The Salafist Nour Party also condemned the attack. "The attack on the church and the killing of fellow Egyptian citizens is against Islamic teachings," said Sherif Taha, the official spokesman of the party, in a statement released on Monday.

"This attack could lead to wider sectarian tension between Egyptians," he added, demanding that the state find and arrest those responsible and bring them to justice.

Leader of the Egyptian Social Democratic Party Mohamed Abul-Ghar also condemned the attack, describing it as “cowardly” in a press statement issued earlier on Monday.

Abul-Ghar presented his condolences to the Coptic Church and the Egyptian people in a statement in which he also demanded the authorities arrest “the terrorists behind the shooting.”

Al-Gamaa Al-Islamiya, co-founders of the Muslim Brotherhood-led Pro-Legitimacy Democracy Alliance, also issued a statement late on Sunday condemning the attack and denying any involvement.

While numerous attacks against churches were reported following Morsi's removal from power early July, the most comprehensive wave of attacks was triggered by the forced dispersal of the two main pro-Morsi protest camps in Cairo and Giza on 14 August, which left hundreds dead and thousands injured.

Amnesty International, a London-based rights, group, said that upwards of 200 Christian-owned properties have been attacked and 43 churches seriously damaged across the country, adding that at least four people have been killed.



Search Keywords:


Short link:

 

Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
Ahram Online welcomes readers' comments on all issues covered by the site, along with any criticisms and/or corrections. Readers are asked to limit their feedback to a maximum of 4000 characters (roughly 200 words). All comments/criticisms will, however, be subject to the following code
  • We will not publish comments which contain rude or abusive language, libelous statements, slander and personal attacks against any person/s.
  • We will not publish comments which contain racist remarks or any kind of racial or religious incitement against any group of people, in Egypt or outside it.
  • We welcome criticism of our reports and articles but we will not publish personal attacks, slander or fabrications directed against our reporters and contributing writers.
  • We reserve the right to correct, when at all possible, obvious errors in spelling and grammar. However, due to time and staffing constraints such corrections will not be made across the board or on a regular basis.
9



Allen
23-10-2013 07:13am
11-
6+
The brotherhood.
The peace loving brotherhood? The propaganda vs. its criminal reality has never added up. That is why no one around the world is buying it. Regardless which country they hide at, the brotherhood hoodlums are just that.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
Farhan
31-10-2013 09:50am
2-
2+
No body is buying propaganda from Allen the Nazi
:-) , you are wasting your time.
8



Allen
23-10-2013 07:13am
10-
5+
The brotherhood.
The peace loving brotherhood? The propaganda vs. its criminal reality has never added up. That is why no one around the world is buying it. Regardless which country they hide at, the brotherhood hoodlums are just that.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
7



Farid
22-10-2013 12:10pm
1-
8+
Watch and learn
For all those ignorants out there who don't see brother/sister in other person, but they are blinded by religious unjustified rage... Please find time to watch amazing movie "Where do we go now" by Nadine Labaki, telling story of a group of Lebanese women who try to ease religious tensions between Christians and Muslims in their village. Maybe you will have chance to learn something else than hate...
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
Farhan
31-10-2013 09:53am
4-
1+
Christians are also assisting Assad in killing thousands of Muslims in Syria.
They just look for chance to destroy the Muslim countries.
Farhan
31-10-2013 09:52am
3-
0+
Christians only try to reduce religious tension where they are minorities
They always try to increase religious tension when they are in power. Look what is happening in West, how they treat Muslims. How they want to kick out all the Muslims.
6



Ahly
22-10-2013 01:19am
13-
13+
Unlikley to be MB
It's highly unlikely to be MB. This is the last thing they want to do. They are a very organized, very strategic group. Such attacks do not fit their profile. Such attacks would not benefit them in any way shape or form. And after all, if you listen to the Egyptian news, America supports MB and America wouldn't want them to attack a Church, and they don't have many other allies to help them. It's also unlikely to be them since they are mostly dead, in jail, or scattered. Blaming them OR ANY Islamists is unfair and premature. Honestly, this is more in the hallmark of the old regime they thrived on the promise of "stability". They said without them Egyptians would tear each other apart. They told other countries that "the muslims in our country hate you and we are keeping them at bay" they told people in Egypt that the are keeping them safe. And they told the copts that if they are out of power the Muslims would kill them. My guess is some old regime official is trying to spread more directed violence in the streets to win Coptic approval for when he runs for elections. He can then come out with a "tough on violence, moving towards stability" message.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
caronlineq
08-11-2013 10:03am
0-
1+
the left hand doesn't know what the right hand does in the MB
The MB has one face for the media and others for their various arms. It is a pity that those who believe that th MB are a peaceful group fail to recognize that their secret arms are comprised of thugs, thieves and extremists. There are none so blind as those who just don't want to see.
Sari Hindi
22-10-2013 10:29am
12-
11+
agree, but
If the US is behind the MB, why did the US allow pliant puppet regimes such SA and UAE to give billions to the Sisi junta? But I do agree with you, this attack doesn't carry the fingerprints of the MB.It could be the Sisi junta that did it. The Junta is too expedient and too unethical to refrain from doing such a thing.
5



Hanadi Akasha
21-10-2013 07:01pm
26-
28+
two-way street
Well. if Muslims are barred from practicing their faith, Christians , too, will be barred as well. If Mosques are burned at Coptic Church instructions, Churches will suffer as well. Christians in Egypt can only be free and safe if Muslims are free and safe. Period.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
Daniel Mousa
21-10-2013 11:35pm
7-
11+
A great civilization that employs Baltagiyya to murder and rape children!
a grat civilization that murders innocent people by the thousands and then claims they committed suicide!
Amir Shukri
21-10-2013 11:31pm
13-
15+
Copts have no right to impose secularism on Muslims
Islam says that Muslims should conduct themselves according to the Sharia. Copts insist on applying fascist secularism on Muslims. They have no right to do so.
Hassan Jammoul
21-10-2013 11:20pm
13-
15+
Yes, Islam is being targeted in Egypt
Muslims are indeed barred from practicing their faith. Doesn't the ban on Islamic political party amount to barring Muslims from practicing their faith?
Hanadi Akasha
21-10-2013 11:13pm
13-
15+
The Coptic Church is guilty- not Copts
Ervin: the Coptic Church has been the no.1 accomplice in the massacres against the Islamists since July 3rd. The Copts are simply paying the price for their church's criminality and perfidy. Yes, mosques at Rabaa have been burned and the headquarters of the MB were repeatedly burned by Coptic activists. You betrayed the Islamists and colluded with the criminal junta against the only democratically-elected president in Egypt's entire history. I am against the killing of innocent people, but the Coptic church is not innocent.It is blatantly anti-Islam and that is unacceptable and dangerous in a predominantly Muslim country.
Ervin
21-10-2013 08:19pm
22-
96+
what nonsense
Which Muslims are barred from practicing their faith? Can you please name any case? Which Mosque was burned at Coptic Church instruction? We're really curious to read about it. It seems to me that the ones burned were the Coptic Churches in Upper Egypt. How in the world a religion which is worshipped by the minority can command the majority? As per your words, one can think that Islam is the minority religion, whereas Christianity is the majority. Or is this just petty hate speech, which I regret to hear from someone a grand civilization, such as Egypt.
4



Joe
21-10-2013 05:21pm
22-
93+
Sam
Sam Enslow summed it all up perfectly but I'd like to add that the website Jihadwatch and others like it should be shut down. They do nothing but incite hatred. The admin of that site should be prosecuted along with these beasts these swine who dare to call themselves Muslims and who advocate and spread intolerance through Wahabism and it's extremist ideology speading like a cancer through Egypt the last 20 years. Let's hope these monsters who killed the Copts are caught swiftly and dealt with harshly. A Muslim is mourning for Egypt
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
Ervin
21-10-2013 09:26pm
10-
66+
hypocrisy
Hanna, so why don't you deal directly with those who commited it, or you just want to find an scapegoat? This is cowardly to the fullest extent, attacking the unprotected. I repeat, COWARDLY
Hanna Ayoub
21-10-2013 07:05pm
111-
25+
Don"t forget: Thousands of Egyptian Muslims have been murdered
thousands of Muslims have been murdered at the incitement of the Coptic leadership. Why is the big fuss about the death of 2 or 3 Copts?
3



very very critical
21-10-2013 01:57pm
0-
24+
When will they be brought to justice!!
Why we always hear "condemn" and never "brought to justice". Many seem to be apprehended but very few , if any, are brought to justice !! Why????
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
2



Sade Egyptian
21-10-2013 01:19pm
37-
36+
Shame on MB and their folowers
Either demonstrating and disrupting roads , universities and trafics or kill innocent people to get their message heard.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
Ervin
21-10-2013 09:33pm
25-
25+
ridiculous
Dear Sammih, So why is the Coptic Church fascist? If they are so, then the whole amount of people which demonstrated on the 30th of June are fascist. Why you blame the others for your own failures? Isn't this hypocrisy? Or better to say, COWARDLY
Abdul Salam
21-10-2013 07:17pm
10-
11+
The MB doesn't exist except in the heart of men!
The MB is banned. It doesn't exist. Why blame a group that doesn't exist except in the hearts of men? Ha ha ha
Sammih Ayoub
21-10-2013 07:08pm
19-
21+
Copts are targeted because of their association with the fascist junta
They played the democratic card, but the fascists, including the Coptic Church, wouldn't allow them.
1



Sam Enslow
21-10-2013 12:57pm
27-
105+
Religion out of politics
It is the responsibility to the mosques and churches to put an end to all the hate rhetoric coming from places of worship. It is not enough to send congratulations to each other on holidays. The sectarian feuds are not new (remember Ramadan 2004, for example). Until the clerics are seen working together and getting all members of their communities working together, this hatred will continue to grow. Those who remained silent when the Salafi destroyed Sufi shrines are as guilty as those who participated in the destruction. Silence implies approval or acceptance of such behavior. The Salafi and other Islamists must have Islam used against them. Guns alone will only strengthen feelings (true and false) of being persecuted. The hate mongers in the name of religion are not men of God, and they should not be treated as such. They are men seeking political and/or financial gain for themselves. They must be exposed, and no one can be more effective in this than those who understand the religion being betrayed by charlatans. The government has no business being involved in religion. These crimes should be handled as crimes only. For legal purposes the religions involved should be ignored - no special treatment, no meeting of elders. The crimes are a violation of law and should be punished as such. In any case, the government has enough to do without adding controls on religion as another job. Get the economy going, insure the rule of law apples to all, get the trains running, fight corruption and crimes against persons, etc. These are the jobs of government. Even by establishing a state religion, the government makes one faith (one group of people) lesser than others. Egypt should also stop asking the people to list their beliefs on ID cards and other documents. Your faith is between you and your God. It is no one else's business.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
Sam Enslow
22-10-2013 11:24am
0-
6+
Killing of innocents
I am suprised at those finding excuses for these murders. I always thought the killing of innocents was prohibited by Islam. I do not remember any "except for" clauses in this concept.
Noura Saleh
21-10-2013 07:12pm
25-
24+
anything can be expected now
words..just words. After the fascist coup and the usurpation of the people's will at the hands of the Church and the military, anything can be expected.
Sam Enslow
21-10-2013 05:32pm
24-
22+
Each one makes a difference
No one can be silent. When you hear these hate mongers, do not make excuses, speak up. Hatred is not part of any religion. Forget about "wongs" of the past, and start to build a better future TODAY. Your religion is not shown by the length of your beard or by the size of the cross around your neck. Your true religion is how you live your life. All else is show.
Words of Wisdom
21-10-2013 02:46pm
21-
19+
How to spread this?
I love your comment above, I could not have put it better myself! The key question is how does one promote such a philosophy and attitude toward life that is the million dollar question for peace!

© 2010 Ahram Online. Advertising