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Britain's Guardian backs 'counter-revolution', says Egypt presidential aide

Ahmed El-Muslimany condemns newspaper's coverage of Mohamed Morsi's removal and subsequent crackdown on Islamists

Ahram Online, Monday 28 Oct 2013
Ahmed El-Muslimany
Ahmed El-Muslimany, Egyptian presidential media advisor (Photo: Ahram)
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A media advisor to Egypt's interim president has labelled The Guardian newspaper a "mouthpiece for the counter revolution."

Ahmed El-Muslimany said the British daily had "lost a lot of its reputation among Egyptian readers" because of its "anti-30 June revolution" stance, in a statement reported by state news agency MENA on Monday.

Protesters took to the streets on 30 June calling for president Mohamed Morsi to resign before the army deposed him on 3 July and announced an interim roadmap. 

There has been intense debate about whether the move was a military coup or not.

Egyptian official discourse insists the move was a popular uprising to pave the way for democracy, while Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood says it was a coup and continues to call for his reinstatement.

In the wake of Morsi's ouster, British Prime Minister David Cameron said, "We never support in countries the intervention by the military, but what needs to happen now in Egypt is for democracy to flourish and for a genuine democratic transition to take place."

In September, Egyptian Foreign Minister Nabil Fahmy met with his British counterpart William Hague at the UN General Assembly in New York. They discussed bilateral relations and British investment in Egypt.

El-Muslimany criticised several headlines in The Guardian, citing an editorial by Jonathan Steele who wrote, "General Sisi and his followers are condemning Egypt to greater turmoil."

"The Guardian... does not know anything about what is happening in Egypt," El-Muslimany said. "All its journalistic ability is copying from counter-revolution websites."

The newspaper has not officially responded to El-Muslimany's statements.

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azza radwan sedky
28-10-2013 10:29pm
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But it isn't the Guardian only!
Not only the Guardian but also most western media are against Egypt's revolution. I find it truly atrocious, which is why I wrote "What western media doesn't get about Egypt" and it was published in the Tyee, an online newspaper in Canada.
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samy youssef
28-10-2013 06:53pm
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A Big Parrot
This man called El-Muslimany was strongly criticized for his irresponsible declaration about the Guardian, a reputable newspaper which was found back in the nineteenth centuries, even before his grand grand father was born, but that is the coup personnel ,any one saying no to them is a traitors, last thing they did, was arresting at Cairo airport one of a sportsman coming from Russia, who won a golden medal in Karate because they say a political opponent, this was unprecedented in the history of Egypt, they also arrest high school girls at their homes, believe this?! because those students raise a slogans different to what the coup raise, as for El-Muslimany, any educated man here knows that is creature is just a parrot, he never had an independent rather a different opinion he is just reciting what is said by his interviewer, they call him a parrot so how comes that he is waging an insult campaign against one of the greatest source of information in the world, The Guardian , so please forgive us because nowadays we are back in the middle ages, all what you can do now is to publish their shamed and infamy deeds,waiting for the people to remove this nightmare, the coup, and be able to live once more as any free nation just free nation. God bless the wise and non idiots.
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caracal
28-10-2013 05:13pm
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The Guardian has lost the plot.
The Guardian lost its credibility by relying almost solely on Robert Fisk for reporting of the events in Egypt from June 30th. Despite being a well-respected veteran reporter on Middle East issues, his reports of events since then have always carried a vehemently anti-military bias which hint at a strong personal predjudice and hatred for the military generals (which he had expressed previously at a lecture of his which I attended some years ago). At this point, neutrality and genuine investigative reporting disappeared and Mr Fisks articles, rather oddly in my opinion, appeared to become a mouthpiece for the Muslim Brotherhood. As an ex-pat who has respected the Guardian for years, I also stopped reading when I realised that the Guardian unquestioningly continues to spout the same anti-military tone in every article. Though the article in question above was authored by Jonathon Steele, the Guardian "lost the plot" long before, by depending solely on Robert FIsk. Whether an uncharacteristic lack of professionalism or intentional bias or a bit of both is unclear, but, sadly, I would confirm that the Guardian has lost all credibility in reporting on the post-Morsi events in Egypt.
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Herman
29-10-2013 08:55am
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Fascism is no. 1 enemy of Egypt
Fisk is a great writer. The little men and women who criticize him for criticizing the fascist junta simply don't know what they are talking about. Fascism is the enemy Egypt.
Jasmin
28-10-2013 08:32pm
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Don't be comic.
Don't be comic. Robert Fisk is not a correspondent for The Guardian. He is writing for The Independent.
Ervin
28-10-2013 06:40pm
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Fisk
I have read some articles of him, probably two or three and I stopped reading when I could sense a really an appalling anti-military sense. (I want to point out that I stop reading also when I read articles on Sisi, depicting him as a deity). I cannot stand the world in black and white. It's frustrating how some journalists, because of some paymasters, or as they call them "contributors", are just for one cause, completely neglecting what happens outside their ivory tower. Sadly, Robert Fisk has build it and he cannot look outside it, probably because he doesn't want to spoil his hands with the common human beings.
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