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Trial of Mohamed Morsi at Police Academy begins, suspended, adjourned
Defendants chant against legitimacy of court, Judge temporarily suspends proceedings twice; deposed president was flown to court on 1st day of trial for inciting murder of protesters in 2012; Judge adjourns to 8 January, 2014
ElSayed Gamal Eldeen, Ayat El-Tawy, Yasmin Fathi, Monday 4 Nov 2013
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Mohamed Morsi Ousted former Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi (C) gets out of a van as he arrives on the first day of his trial, at a courthouse in Cairo, in this still image taken from video provided by Egypt's Interior Ministry on November 4, 2013 (Photo: Reuters)
- Supporters of ousted president Mohamed Morsi protest in front of court, 4 November 2013 (Photo: Mai Shaheen)
MM- File photo of former president Mohamed Morsi (Photo: Reuters)
- Supporters of deposed president Mohamed Morsi chanting inside court (Snapshot of state TV)

The judge presiding over the trial of deposed president Mohamed Morsi and 14 co-defendants adjourned the case to 8 January, 2014 to allow prosecution and defence to examine documents.

The defendants, who are accused of inciting violence and murder in December 2012 against opponents, will remain in jail.

Mohamed Morsi will be sent to Borg Al-Arab prison on the outskirts of the city of Alexandria in the north of the country, according to Egypt state TV.

The rest of Morsi's co-defendant's will return to Tora prison in south Cairo.

The judge had to temporarily suspend the first session of the trial on Monday morning twice as caged defendants chanted asserting the trial is illegitimate, reported Egypt state TV.

Morsi, who was ousted by the army on 3 July amid mass protests against him, has reportedly announced that he would not recognise the authority of any courts claiming he remains the country's legal president.

The trial proceedings were not aired.

Morsi and 14 other senior Islamists and Muslim Brotherhood figures are standing trial on charges of inciting violence and murder at the Ittihadiya presidential palace clashes in December 2012.

At least ten died and 600 were injured in the clashes, which broke out after pro-Morsi protesters attacked a sit-in held by opponents of a presidential decree which had granted the Islamist leader expanded powers.

Footage which circulated on social media outlet showed Brotherhood supporters at Ittihadiya abducting, beating and abusing anti-Morsi demonstrators for hours at a time during the clashes.

Morsi attacks court

During the session, Mohamed Morsi asserted that he is the "legitmate president of the country," calling on "Egypt's judiciary not to provide cover for the criminal coup d'etat," in reference to his ouster on 3 July.

Morsi added that he was brought to court "by force" calling on the judges to allow him to practice his powers as president, reported Al-Ahram Arabic news website.

According to Ahram Online reporter, minor scuffles broke out inside the court between supporters and opponents of the deposed president.

Morsi had arrived at court earlier than expected on Monday morning, amid security concerns over possible violence by his supporters.

The deposed president had been transported by helicopter to court at the Police Academy in New Cairo earlier in the morning.

His co-defendants were transferred to court via armoured vehicles from south Cairo's Tora prison.

The defendants include: former deputy chairman of the Freedom and Justice Party Essam El-Erian, former deputy chief of staff of the presidential palace Asaad Shiha, former presidential office manager Ahmed Abdel-Ati, former presidential advisor Ayman Hodhod, leading Brotherhood figures Mohamed El-Beltagy and Alaa Hamza, Islamist media figure Abdel-Rahman Ezz, Islamist youth figure Ahmed El-Mogheer, Salafist leader Gamal Saber, and Islamist religious figure Wagdy Ghoneim.

Seven of the defendants are still at large and will be tried in absentia, including Islamist activist Ahmed El-Mogheer and preacher Wagdi Ghoneim.

Defence, supporters, opponents

Before the session started, Ayman Nihad, lawyer for 14 of the defendants, told Ahram Online he would request incorporating reports into the case that accuse then interior minister Ahmed Gamaleddin of "responsiblity for the killings."

The attorney said he would also request access to all documents in the case after the court had denied lawyers permission to examine evidence prior to Monday's opening session.

Lawyers and journalists who secured the appropriate permits entered the court shortly after 10am.

Defence attorneys for the deposed president included prominent lawyer and Islamist thinker Mohamed Selim El-Awa who reportedly recieved a warm welcome by Morsi loyalists who chanted: "Where is the press, the honourable man is here."

El-Awa, a former presidential candidate, complained that many of Morsi's lawyers are not being allowed into court.

According to the Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice Party website, only 4 out of 28 of Morsi's lawyers were allowed in court.

"This did not happen during Mubarak's trial," El-Awa told reporters outside the court.

Security arrangements by both police and military surounding the court have been intensified.

The pro-Morsi National Alliance to Support Legitimacy on Sunday reiterated its call for supporters to rally at the court on Monday.

According to Ahram Online reporter outside the academy, several dozen Morsi protesters had gathered near army barricades surrounding street entrances to the trial venue chanting "down with military rule," and "With our lives and blood we defend Islam."

Morsi supporters also chanted against general commander of the armed forces Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi.

Many pro-Morsi protesters were reluctant to speak to the media unless its Qatari-owned Al-Jazeera channel, which is known for its Brotherhood bias.

One pro-Morsi demonstrator Gamal Azzab, told Ahram Online: "I'm not a protester. I’m a sympathiser with president Morsi after the coup has sabotaged his legitimacy. The 2012 constitution that all Egyptians had voted for states that a president stays for four years."

Meanwhile, a few anti-Morsi protesters chanted "down with the traitor, down with the terrorist." 





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13



Haq
07-11-2013 04:01am
1-
1+
Impartial, Sloppy Reporting
Al-Jazeera denies all allegations of being biased towards the MB so how can Al-Ahram claim this is a fact in the following sentence: "Qatari-owned Al-Jazeera channel, which is known for its Brotherhood bias". Any competent, unbiased reporter would have written: "Qatari-owned Al-Jazeera channel, which is accused of being biased towards the Brotherhood".
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12



S
04-11-2013 09:37pm
2-
29+
Not again!
Again and again everybody is talking about that he was an elected president, which is so irrelevant here. We KNOW he won the elections fair and square, and indeed he took office.. no one objected to that, despite allegations over elections rigging, and he took the office and Egypt witnessed protest-less months under his presidency .. but what people objected against is the constitutional deceleration by which he broke his oath, not to mention breaking many other promises.. what people revolted against is the upsurge of Islamic extremists sponsored by the presidency and the Brotherhood (again, breaking a promise to be a president for all egyptian), while ignoring the main demands of the revolution that put him in that position in the first place.. he also kept the police as brutal as ever, cooperated with corrupt former regime figures, and the list goes on.. his legitimacy, which he got through elections, was GONE thanks to what he did!!
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Farhan
05-11-2013 07:54am
6-
1+
MN won 12 elections under military control
but you Nazis propagandists would still spread you lies that elections were rigged. MB was top in all parties in all elections but you Nazis want to kill top party so that you could come into power, but now military is in power and your dreams willl only be dreams.
11



Mali
04-11-2013 06:55pm
24-
1+
Is a coup and he will be back to power
I really blame the democratic countries for being silient on this rediculous trial. How long arab are going be there to make fool of themselves. He (Mohammed Morsi)is a democaraticly elected president and that is it!!!! Good or Bad He must come back to power and they have to be patient untel next election. French, English and American gave as a hard time last decades about democracy, democracy and democaracy. and now there is a democraticly elected president they support the coup. since when the arm is best solution? Those are approving the military are mistaking. and it the military stay in power because people accept them and want them. so have them and we will never be there to support you. You will take care of yourselve because no one will be there for you the world will turn their back to you (you supporters of the millitary). and you will never get read of them. because they have tanks and are hearless. Who want to be slave of the army tough luck.
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10



Sassa James
04-11-2013 06:33pm
26-
1+
He has the truth on his side
Muhammed Mursi doesn't have the power, but he has the truth on his side.
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Ervin
04-11-2013 06:53pm
1-
21+
fake
He has the truth as you have a real name shown here. Please don't disguise yourself under phony Western names but show your real name, then you can speak
9



Ervin
04-11-2013 05:24pm
5-
74+
illegal
Firstly, Morsi was elected by a 51% majority based on electoral pledges that he made to various opposition parties who switched their votes to him. He promptly reneged on those pledges. Again, after an autocratic rule which Egypt had and to which Egypt was used to, winning with a 51% is very tight result. Many have reported on the MB thugs that prevented Copts to vote. Some trusted sources even say that in fact Shafiq had won but the Ikwan talked to the SCAF and allegedly said that Shafiq cannot win because there would be a bloodbath, so then the SCAF turned the vote to Morsi. Morsi should have understood that with such a tight result, he should have "ruled" for all, not for some (the MB). If he was smart, he would have known that after such a polarization which Egypt was into after the January revolution, he needed to represent all and not only a fraction of the society, namely his group. But we all know how it went and this caused Morsi's own downfall, he with his own hands. Secondly, everyone always talks about how the MB won elections. They won 45% of the lower house seats, but based on the purchase of votes, and on the jerrymandering of the "independent" constituency - basically they stole the independent seats. They won the upper house election against a boycott by the opposition parties. The voter turnout was only 10%. The upper house has a role akin to the house of lords in UK, with no legislative powers. Morsi used a presidential decree to vest the upper house with legislative powers, and showed no real haste to call for fresh lower house elections, the real Parliament of Egypt. At the same time he decreed that his decisions were immune to legal challenge. The "House of Lords", newly empowered by Morsi, then appointed a constitutional assembly. It was unelected. And it contained a 90% majority of islamists. It rushed through an islamist constitution in an all-night sitting. So. Where exactly was Morsi's mandate, popular, clean or legal, to impose his group's own agenda and to try to force (islamic) republic on the people of Egypt?
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Farhan
05-11-2013 07:41am
4-
1+
No party has majority in Egypt and Morsi's party was the biggest party.
Even if was won by one vote, it does not give right to fascist military to kill thousands of people and do the coup. They should have waited for another election.
Ostasia
04-11-2013 06:23pm
1-
38+
Well said
And the 51% he won the election with were only about from 46% of registered voters. So hardly the majority. Actually, the 54% who didn't vote, wanted neither of the candidates, boycotted or were prevented from voting. I still remember all of us sitting barricaded in our homes on the day of the announcement, as they were clearly threatening us if Morsi didn't win, there would be blood in the streets of Egypt. They won by force and cheating and they ruled by force. Nobody can say he was democratically elected by the people, only 12 Million voted for him out of approx. 45 Million registered voters.
Peter Hans
04-11-2013 06:21pm
46-
0+
The secular opposition are the true terrorists -Islamists the true democrats
Even if he won by only one vote he is still the legitimate Preisdent. The claim that he wone by 51 % is made by people with a primitive political culture like Ervin. In well-established democratic countries, Presidents win by 51 or 52%. Muhammed Mursi won three times, the anti-Islamic opposition lost three times. They only have themselves to blame. This trial is a farce. The opposition are the true terrorists, they first torched the Muslim Brotherhood headqyarters, then they tried to carry out a pogrom at the Ittahidya palace, they they murdered thousands at Rabaa and now they have the face to call the Islamists "terrorists" These people are the true terrorists. They are fornicating with truth. The Islamists are the true democrats in Egypt.
8



Haitham Awni
04-11-2013 03:06pm
48-
5+
he is the legitimate president
Farcical trial of the cleanest President leader in 7000 years. He was eleted by the people, he won elections three times, he didn't hurt anybody. But the thugs of the deep state won't allow democracy to take root.
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TH
04-11-2013 05:49pm
1-
44+
"he didn't hurt anybody" !!!!
Haitham, not sure where you have been but let me share a different point of view and show you how Morsi HURT US ALL. As President, he is responsible for the economic collapse of the country, the destruction of the Tourism business, the increase in illegal arms in Sinai and elsewhere, the lawlessness on the streets, the release of prisoners that have since returned to crime, the isolation of Egypt from our Arab friendsexcept for his Qatari and Hamas contacts, and most importantly, he is responsible for dividing the Egyptian people , Moslem against Moslem and Moslem against Copt. Haitham, this is what Morsi accomplised in little time and this is why the Egyptian people had to make a change.
7



Jum'atil Fajar
04-11-2013 01:57pm
31-
6+
Military coupt will come to end
Every day, every one in the world will be know, that military coupt never give place for democracy. They will protect their own agenda. This trial will show to the world how "their drama" will be played, and every one can show this drama that will show clearyly what their true hidden agenda.
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6



Bashar
04-11-2013 12:01pm
15-
3+
Itehadia Presidential Palace Testimonies and Facts...cont.
The above video shows Colonel Omar Afifi criticizing the lack of ‘appropriate’ action by NSF members, on bloody Wednesday, to storm the presidential palace, calling them ‘cowards’. In a report by journalist Saber Mashhour, Al-Jazeera Mubashir (live) correspondent, he showed clear signs of a definite plot to storm the presidential palace, which was prevented by the Brotherhood. Fahmi Howeidi, independent Egyptian writer who suggested a dialogue initiative in Egypt, wrote an article entitled 'Fair investigation wanted of alleged human rights violations around the presidential palace' in which he said: This is a serious matter that should not be left to suspicions and hearsay, but must be made totally clear through prosecution or security investigations. So far, we have not received an official statement to clarify just exactly what happened. Our only source of information is still what we receive through the media and witness and victim accounts. Howeidi added: Most of the time, both opponents and supporters were peaceful – throughout the day, and until eight in the evening. But signs of a looming battle emerged later on, after dark. Oral abuse devolved into stone-throwing, then knives, birdshots, live bullets, teargas bombs and Molotov cocktails were used. The meeting of the two camps was an implicit call to ‘hidden hands’ seeking to deepen discord and fuel the fire of strife and sedition in order to advance and achieve special goals. It is no secret that thugs paid and masterminded by unknown parties are the so-called hidden hands. If the absence of police and security forces has raised some questions, this background raises even more questions, not only about the source of the violence, but also about the parties that stand behind it. Howeidi quotes Abdel-Moneim Abdel-Maksoud, Brotherhood lawyer: If the Brotherhood had its own militia, as falsely reported by the media, and if such militia did go to Itehadia Palace armed and ready for a fight, why so many of them fell, martyrs and injured? Ultimately, the Itehadia Presidential Palace incident remains unclear – especially after the notorious bloody Camel Battle. It remains the subject of many questions, with hints at ‘hidden hands’, third parties and former regime loyalists who were acquitted in trials for killing revolutionary youths.
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5



Bashar
04-11-2013 12:00pm
3-
1+
Itehadia Presidential Palace Testimonies and Facts...cont.
...Wagdi urged the media to come down and see that the majority of the injured and the martyrs are Muslim Brotherhood youths, and to talk about their tragedies which are being kept out of sight. Wagdi further refused that thugs who used teargas bombs would be called ‘demonstrators’. In pain, Wagdi wondered: Does difference in political points of view means I get killed? On the FJP official website, Amr Maghawri, civil engineer and a Brotherhood youth, said he was wounded in the presidential palace clashes, and that he and his colleagues went there to defend State institutions. He added: I arrived outside Itehadia Palace at five o'clock in the afternoon. I found the President's opponents standing next to the palace walls pouring most obscene abuse at Egypt’s elected president. But they walked away from the area about six o’clock. Half an hour later, armed men marched in and started attacking us with stones. We tried to create human chains to protect women and children. Shortly, opposition thugs attacked us with various firearms, including birdshot, and even Molotov cocktails. Violence escalated against us dramatically very fast, especially when we got to nearby Roxy Square. This was a trap, an ambush waiting for us. It was then that I heard and saw a Brotherhood youth die, hit by a live bullet. Maghawri went on: What struck my attention – and suspicion – the most was teargas bombs which thugs threw at us. At that moment, I realized those were no revolutionaries, but part of an organized conspiracy to undermine the legitimacy of President Morsi. Then, at ten o'clock, I got hit by a stone in my face. It cut my eyebrow and damaged the retina of my left eye. I was taken to hospital, where I underwent an eye operation. More Moving Testimonies by Muslim Brotherhood Victims On Moraselon (Reporters) website published testimonies by several victims affiliated with the Muslim Brotherhood who gvve their accounts of the bloody day. Salah Adel Abu-Hamida, student at Al-Azhar University – east of Cairo, was wounded by birdshots in his arm and foot. Mohamed Abdel-Raouf, computer engineer – a Brotherhood youth, suffered a dislocated shoulder after thugs beat him with an iron bar. Abdel-Raouf said he was about to enter the area surrounding the presidential palace, through Salah Salem Street, when he was ambushed by large numbers of thugs who rushed towards him wielding all kinds of weapons. He stressed that the thugs he saw do not look anything like civilized demonstrators or protesters, but much like gangsters, drug-addicts and criminals. Ahmed Fouad Abdel-Rahman, 40 years old, tells what he saw in Mirghani Street, where he was wounded, saying: At about half past eight on Wednesday evening, a large number of thugs went on the rampage. Although supporters of the president chanted "peaceful, peaceful", the thugs attacked us with stones, Molotov cocktails and teargas bombs. I was next to a gas station in Mirghani Street when they tried to storm the station. We did all we can to defend ourselves against the stones they threw at us. We were totally unarmed. Suddenly, live bullets rang out, directed at the gas station. They used their guns against us while we were unarmed. Before I got hit by birdshots in my chest and neck, I saw a young friend fall next to me and ambulance staff rush to take him away. Abdel-Rahman said that it was obvious all shots were aimed at the face and neck. Why did the Brotherhood Go To Itehadia in the First Place? A careful analysis of the Brotherhood decision to go down to Itehadia to show support for President Morsi convinced Egyptian journalists and intellectuals of the need for media and human rights organizations to expose the evident plot to storm the presidential palace. Some televised interviews with Mamdouh Hamza, member of National Salvation Front (NSF), reveal the plot to storm the presidential palace. Here is a link for those, And another link here.
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4



Bashar
04-11-2013 11:57am
0-
1+
Itehadia Presidential Palace Testimonies and Facts...cont.
Dealing with thugs with this indulgent leniency caused a legal crisis in Egypt recently. The Egyptian Public Prosecutor transferred Justice Mustafa Khater attorney general for East Cairo prosecution service, after Khater took charge of the investigation in the Itehadia suspects and quickly released them for lack of incriminating evidence. Here is a link to a video of an Itehadia demonstrator who lost his left eye. "This is Ayman Sayed, a Muslim Brotherhood youth from Shubra Al-Khaima who was hit in his left eye by birdshot during Itehadia clashes. Doctors operated on his injured eye, but said he will not be able to see with that eye any more. Like Sayed, there are hundreds of Brotherhood youths who were injured in those same violent events". Sayed says: I was at Itehadia Presidential Palace to show support for President Morsi's Decrees. We were viciously attacked by thugs who do not recognize or respect the lowest standards of human rights. They had firearms, Molotov cocktails, teargas bombs and knives, while we were completely unarmed. Dr. Osama Noureddine told Ikhwanweb: This situation is totally unacceptable. These eyes were not just injured spontaneously . Both the media and human rights organizations must show the world the tragedy these youths will suffer for life because of the acts of violence by heavily armed outlaws who cannot be described in any way at all as demonstrators. Dr. Noureddine stresses that there is a shameful silence about the violent attacks against the Muslim Brotherhood around Itehadia Presidential Palace, and that the incident needs to be further documented for the whole world, which should not remain silent on the killing and injuring of more than a thousand Muslim Brotherhood members who were demonstrating peacefully in support of Egypt’s democratically elected President. Noureddine further demanded that opposition demonstrators must report thugs who infiltrated the ranks of peaceful protesters to violate the most basic of human rights. Misr 25 satellite TV channel, the only TV channel that documented testimonies from inside hospitals, aired interviews with injured youths. Khaled Khattab before entering the operating room to have a bullet extracted from his thigh. Khattab said: We were suddenly hit with live bullets and birdshots. When the prosecutor asked me, I accused opposition leaders who instigated strife and sedition in Egypt. Hisham Kamel, who resides in Al-Haram area in Giza Governorate, was also wounded when a bullet shattered his foot. Kamel said: When anti-Morsi protesters marched in front of the Presidential Palace before Wednesday, we did not go to demonstrate against them. So, later on, when we came, we were surprised to see them come over, while we were still there. Then, they shot us with live bullets. According to Ikhwanweb, in the days before and after Itehadia clashes, there were concerted efforts by opposition to impose a new reality by attempting to monopolize all liberty squares across Egypt, especially Tahrir Square, preventing supporters of the President from exercising their right to demonstrate. The Brotherhood and other pro-Morsi groups postponed million-man marches and rallies that they later held outside Cairo University rather than in Tahrir Square. When Brotherhood and supporters moved to back in the vicinity of the Itehadia Palace, opponents insisted on coming to confront them. This repressive approach to the freedom to demonstrate and express views was never before used by the opposition. Nevertheless, the President's supporters are very clearly more numerous. Yasser Wagdi was injured by a bullet that penetrated his intestines. Having undergone several operations to save his life, he spoke with great difficulty, saying: We were ambushed by thugs who attacked us with teargas bombs and live bullets; but we had absolutely no weapons.
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