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Wednesday, 17 July 2019

Khaled Said's police brutality case judges no-show

Judiciary committee fails to show up in Alexandria court for police brutality case over the beating and death of Khaled Said, which was a catapult for the Egypt's 25 January revolution

Ahram Online, Saturday 26 Mar 2011
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The case against the two police officers accused of killing Khaled Saeed has been postponed indefinitely after the judiciary committee failed to show up to the Alexandria court on Saturday.

Khaled Saeed's family and supporters have renewed their demonstrations outside of the courthouse to protest the latest postponement.

Policemen, Mahmoud Salah Mahmoud and Awad Ismael Soliman are accused of beating to death 28-year old Said, which they deny.

Popular outrage was triggered across the country when morgue pictures of Saeed’s disfigured face and accounts of his confrontation with police were circulated through social media sites after his death on 6 June, 2010.

Several demonstrations have been held already in Alexandria and Cairo demanding the prosecution of police officers allegedly responsible for Saeed’s death.

Khaled Saeed was one of the poster faces for the 25 January Revolution in Egypt. A Facebook page under the name “We are all Khaled Said” was set up in an effort to 'do something.' The members of that Facebook group called for peaceful protests, and eventually were the ones who called for the first demonstrations on the 25 January, which was initially planned as a day of anger against police brutality but later developed into a national-scale revolt.

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Alan Cockayne
26-03-2011 03:24pm
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Case against the killers of Khaled Saeed
If this case was tried and the policemen found guilty, it would set a massive precident in Egypt, opening up a wider spectrum of law-suits agaist the security attrocities over 30 years. It should take place. If it does not then the judiciary are putting themselves in question as to their role in Egypt's society.
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dave
26-03-2011 01:59pm
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Why not?
Are they afraid of the protesters, afraid of the police, or what? The author may not want to speculate but something more is needed. Why postponed indefinitely? Did the committee give a reason?
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