Last Update 20:29
Tuesday, 17 October 2017

Al-Gamaa Al-Islamiya to boycott Egypt's constitutional referendum

Hardline group believes the new constitution is undemocratic and contrary to Egyptian family values

Ahram Online , Saturday 21 Dec 2013
Share/Bookmark
Views: 1421
Share/Bookmark
Views: 1421

Leading Islamist group Al-Gamaa Al-Islamiya announced Saturday its decision to boycott the coming constitutional referendum on 14-15 January.

The group said that 75 percent of its members had voted to boycott the national poll, while 25 percent had voted for a no vote in the upcoming referendum.

In a statement, the group said that it will launch a campaign to urge people to boycott the vote, arguing that the constitution “has been drafted by a non-elected secular minority that seeks to marginalise Islamic identity and the role of the Islamic sharia as well as to get rid of all moral restrictions and the traditions of the Egyptian family and establish a military oppressive state.”

The 2012 constitution was suspended in July when Islamist president Mohamed Morsi was ousted and imprisoned, after nationwide protests against him. Many of his opponents argued the constitution, drafted by an Islamist-dominated assembly, failed to protect rights and freedoms or the status of minorities. A new draft was prepared by a committee of fifty members, selected by the current interim government.

Al-Gamaa Al-Islamiya supported Morsi during his presidency, and is currently a member of the National Alliance to Support Legitimacy, a leading pro-Morsi coalition group.

The group further stated that it considers participating in the referendum a recognition of the “coup” against Morsi as well as “ongoing oppressive actions.”

The group also said it is sure the referendum will be rigged and that “it is impossible to participate in a referendum over a constitution that was not based on consensus but was drafted to exclude the Islamist current."

Short link:

 

Email
 
Name
 
Comment's
Title
 
Comment
Ahram Online welcomes readers' comments on all issues covered by the site, along with any criticisms and/or corrections. Readers are asked to limit their feedback to a maximum of 1000 characters (roughly 200 words). All comments/criticisms will, however, be subject to the following code
  • We will not publish comments which contain rude or abusive language, libelous statements, slander and personal attacks against any person/s.
  • We will not publish comments which contain racist remarks or any kind of racial or religious incitement against any group of people, in Egypt or outside it.
  • We welcome criticism of our reports and articles but we will not publish personal attacks, slander or fabrications directed against our reporters and contributing writers.
  • We reserve the right to correct, when at all possible, obvious errors in spelling and grammar. However, due to time and staffing constraints such corrections will not be made across the board or on a regular basis.
4



Silence Dolittle
22-12-2013 12:31am
1-
10+
Hypocrites
So when Islamists draft an overnight constitution that is voted on by less han 35% of eligible voters, it is legitimate? The 2012 constitution was supposed to be for all Egyptians yet Islamists managed to isolate everyone else when drafting it. And guess what, it was liberals that boycotted it at that time. I am not saying what is happening now is fair to Islamists, but give me a break. They did the same thing to the liberals back in 2012 and if it was okay for them to do it then they should accept it being done to them. And all this talk about destroying Egypt's Islamic identity is complete nonsense - just because people disagree with you politically does not make them less religious yet the Islamist parties insist on using the argument that people who do not want a religious state are atheists. It is getting old.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
3



Allen
21-12-2013 07:44pm
3-
6+
Oooooh what a tragic loss.... ;-))
You will be sooo missed every one wanted to roll the red carpet for you fine terrorists
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
2



Jon
21-12-2013 05:42pm
1-
0+
Too soon and too easy
The referendum will be held. It will provide the military with some legitimacy, as did the 2012 referendum for the Morsi constitution (although the turnout then was only 33%). It would be smarter for the Islamist parties to demand a broad representation of international observers and other checks an balances during the referendum. If these demands are met, one could consider participating, possibly by asking the followers to vote "no". In a fair referendum, it should be possible for the anti-military forces, that won 2/3 of the seats in the parliamentary election in 2011, to defeat the Sisi constitution at the ballot box.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
1



Leila Murad
21-12-2013 02:57pm
9-
0+
KAFER CONSTITUTION
In article 74, it allows Marxists to form political parties based on Marxism but bars Muslims from forming political parties based on Islam. This a Kafer anti-Islamic constitution.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
Yasmina
23-12-2013 08:55am
0-
0+
Two separate issues
Marxism is a political ideology, Islam is a religion. For this reason a Marxist party
Silence Dolittle
22-12-2013 10:41pm
0-
4+
In Addition
Germany's laws prohibit any political party from basing it's ideology on the Nazi party. Would you consider them fascists too? The point is, sometimes government has to step in to prevent certain groups from destroying the country. You may find it unfair to you, but guess what, you can blame your leaders for that. Islamists have shown that the only thing they are good at is creating a division, or rift, in society, "agree with me or you're going to hell". That's not how you rule a country and is a recipe for violence. Banning Islamic Parties is 100% political - but have you ever thought that people are also simply tired of politicians telling them what is right and what is wrong in the name of God? We have other institutions for that.
Silence Dolittle
22-12-2013 10:33pm
0-
3+
Thank You For Making My Point
Thank you for making my point by using the word "Kafr", a word being used to commonly now by Islamists to describe people who disagree with them politically.
Latest

© 2010 Ahram Online.