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Egypt's foreign ministry reiterates refusal of 'foreign interference' in wake of activists case

Foreign ministry spokesman says foreign interference in Egypt's domestic affairs is unacceptable

Marina Barsoum , Wednesday 25 Dec 2013
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Spokesperson of the Egyptian Ministry of Foreign Affairs Badr Abdel Atti expressed his refusal of foreign interference in Egypt's domestic affairs shortly after the EU expressed concern at the jailing of three prominent activists.

"The foreign ministry has explicitly expressed its opinion in a statement Wednesday about Egypt's position; the statement included that neither a state, organisation nor an institution should interfere in internal Egyptian affairs," Abdel Atti told Ahram Online.

This is not the first time the ministry has condemned the intervention of a foreign state or institution in the internal affairs of the country. The ministry has expressed similar sentiments whenever Western powers commented on developments on Egypt's politcal scene.

On Sunday, a court sentenced April 6 Youth Movement leading figures Ahmed Maher and Mohamed Adel, and revolutionary activist Ahmed Douma, to three years in jail and a LE50,000 fine.

The trio were convicted of assaulting police officers during a demonstration outside a Cairo court where Maher was handing himself in for questioning over allegations he had organised an illegal protest. They were also convicted of organising illegal protests.

"It is unacceptable that any external party comment on the provisions of the judiciary; also the principles of democracy in a democratic country are the separation of powers and respect for court verdicts," Abdel Atti added.   

Abdel Atti's comment came after Catherine Ashton, the EU foreign policy chief, said of the case that "these sentences could be reviewed in an appeals process."

Sebastien Brabant, a spokesman for Ashton, said that the court sentences appear to be based on the recently enacted protest law, which is widely seen as excessively limiting freedom of expression.

Ashton criticised the protest law 1 December, warning it could hinder the country's transition to democracy.

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Jon
26-12-2013 11:35pm
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Absolutely unnecessary
If any foreigner for some reason wanted to hurt or weaken Egypt, he can now take a long vacation: Nobody has ever inflicted more damage to Egypt in a shorter time than the wholly home-made El-Sisi junta.
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Morgan
26-12-2013 09:48am
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When protests are violent and destructive
For three years the MB have shown distain for the majority of the citizens who demanded Morsi be removed from office due to his consistent directorial behavior and tampering with Egyptians' judicial and democratic system which he uprooted to take control for himself and his MB members. The security in the Sinai was removed for only one reason; Morsi had dark plans for Egypt which did not include any sort of democratic process. For three years, our nation endures daily violence and destruction from only one source - The Muslim Brotherhood. We also have other terrorist factions inside our borders, and that lies squarely on Morsi's shoulders; he let them in. Our new protest law is realistic for our situation; we are not obliged to the dictates of the EU or the West because we have a different situation. I've read the new law, and in my judgement, it serves to protect the whole of society. Under the circumstances, this law is most appropriate.
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David
27-12-2013 06:50pm
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When protests are violent and destructive
Only an idiot would think thjat supressing 1/3 of the population can bring security to a country in the verge of economic collapse.
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David Wilson
26-12-2013 08:48am
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"The road to hill is paved with good intentions"
It's laughable to say "It is unacceptable to comment on the provisions of the judiciary". It's really about a military serving justice. In a democracy nobody is above criticism. Still in our fresh memory the 21 children who received 11 years sentences for exercising freedom of expression. It happens only in the land of Pharaohs, probably that's how they enslaved Egyptians to build the great Pyramids.
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Allen
26-12-2013 12:16am
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ABOUT TIME... Tell Ashton to go to nursing home and stay there.
The EU and this woman have shown they are nothing more then a travelling circus.
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Khalid
25-12-2013 08:09pm
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Foriegn Aid only
Only Foriegn Aid is well come to kill,torture and arrest our own Egyptians.Critisim on our crimes against humanity against our own people is not acceptable.Well done FM
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