Last Update 21:6
Preliminary results: 97.7% of votes in favour of Egyptian draft constitution
Ahram Online provides a breakdown of which governorate voted how on the draft constitution plus summary of how the vote count unfolded according to the unofficial count
Ahram Online, Thursday 16 Jan 2014
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Referendum
An result of the vote counting of the constitutional referendum reads "Agree" (Photo: Mai Shaheen)
The High Electoral Committee announced on Thursday afternoon that voters in Cairo governorate have backed the new constitution with a 95.2 percent  "yes" vote and 4.8 percent “no,” Al-Ahram’s daily print edition reported.
                                    
2814000 participated in the referendum out of 6,674,865 registered voters, a 42.2 percent turnout.

2680000 voted yes and 134000 voted no.

Below are the aggregated vote counts of all of Egypt’s 27 governorates.

The turnout of 2014 has surpassed that of the 2012 constitutional referendum by around four million.

           Turnout: 20,308,358

           Yes: 19,538,071 (97.7 percent)

           No: 475,091 (2.3 percent)

 
Below, Ahram Online team compiled a table providing a detailed comparison of voter turnout and results between the 2014 referendum on constitution and the 2012 referendum which took place under the rule of the Muslim Brotherhood.

Unofficial final vote result on Egypt's new constitution

table 10pm
 
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Below, readers will find Ahram Online's blow-by-blow coverage of results as they came in from governorates. The official results are to be announced on Saturday by the Supreme Elections Commission.
 
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20:00 Unofficial final vote result of North Sinai governorate:

           Yes: 36127 (94.4 percent)
          
           No: 2134 (5.6 percent)
          
           Turnout: 38261 (17.1 percent) This figure includes voters not registered in the same governorate, unlike in the 2012 constitutional referendum when constituents were only entitled to cast ballots in their respective governoratas.
 
Turnout of 2012 constitutional referendum: (30.2)
 
08:24 Unofficial final vote result of Nile Delta's Sharqiya governorate:

Yes: 1,664,367 (98.4%)

No: 27,232 (1.6%)

Turnout: 1,699,585 (46.1%) This figure includes voters not registered in the same governorate, unlike in the 2012 constitutional referendum when constituents were only entitled to cast ballots in their respective governorates.

Turnout of 2012 constitutional referendum: (31.4)

08:15 Unofficial final vote result of Daqahliya, north east of Cairo:
 
Yes: 1,845,079  (99.1%)
 
No: 17,024 (0.9%)
 
Turnout: 1,891,617 (49.9) This figure includes voters not registered in the same governorate, unlike in the 2012 constitutional referendum when constituents were only entitled to cast ballots in their respective governorates.
 
Turnout of 2012 constitutional referendum: (31.54)
 
07:11 Unofficial final results of Al-Wadi Al-Gedid, west of Nile Delta:
 
Yes: 50420 (96.5%)
 
No: 1808 (3.5%)
 
06:45 Below are the aggregated vote counts of 22 governorates out of 27. For more details on each governorate please scroll further down:
 
Yes: 13,232,560 (97.9%)
 
No: 290,611 (2.1%)
 
Turnout: 13,744,916
 
06:30 Unofficial final results of Giza:
 
Yes: 1,459,201 (98%)
 
No: 29,461 (2%)
 
Turnout: 1,507,416 (33.4%) This figure includes voters not registered in the same governorate, unlike in the 2012 constitutional referendum when constituents were only entitled to cast ballots in their respective governorates.
 
Turnout of 2012 constitutional referendum: (33.8)
 
05:13 Unofficial final results of Nile Delta's Gharbiya governorate: 
 
Yes: 1,546,042 (98.7 %)
 
No: 20,890 (1.3%)
 
Turnout: 1,561,358 (51.68%) This figure includes voters not registered in the same governorate, unlike in the 2012 constitutional referendum when constituents were only entitled to cast ballots in their respective governorates.
 
Turnout of 2012 constitutional referendum: (33.17%)
 
05:10 Unofficial final results of Nile Delta's El-Monofiya governorate: 
 
Yes: 1,218,240 (96.9%)
 
No: 38,070 (3%)
 
Turnout: 1,269,117 (55%) This figure includes voters not registered in the same governorate, unlike in the 2012 constitutional referendum when constituents were only entitled to cast ballots in their respective governorates.
 
Turnout of 2012 constitutional referendum: (33.37%)
 
05:04 Unofficial final results of Nile Delta's Beheira governorate: 
 
Yes: 1,228,564 (97.9%)
 
No: 26,464 (2.1%)
 
Turnout: 1,270,582 (37.6%) This figure includes voters not registered in the same governorate, unlike in the 2012 constitutional referendum when constituents were only entitled to cast ballots in their respective governorates.
 
Turnout of 2012 constitutional referendum: (33.12%)
 
05:00 Unofficial final results of the northern Alexandria governorate: (corrected)
 
Yes: 1,315,652 (98.4%)
 
No: 21,161 (1.6%)
 
Turnout: 1,346,884 (39.4%) This figure includes voters not registered in the same governorate, unlike in the 2012 constitutional referendum when constituents were only entitled to cast ballots in their respective governorates.
 
Turnout of 2012 constitutional referendum: (35.76%)
 
04:55 Unofficial final results in Fayoum governorate, south of Cairo: 
 
Yes: 368,286 (96.7%)
 
No: 12,541 (3.3%)
 
Turnout: 387,835 (23.8%)
 
Turnout of 2012 constitutional referendum: (34.36%)
 
04:45 Unofficial final results in Nile Delta's Qalyubia governorate
 
Yes: 990,212 (98.4%)
 
No: 16,101 (1.6%)
 
Turnout: 1,017,927 (37.4%) This figure includes voters not registered in the same governorate, unlike in the 2012 constitutional referendum when constituents were only entitled to cast ballots in their respective governorates.  
 
Turnout of 2012 constitutional referendum: (26.35%)
 
04:12 Unofficial final results of Nile delta's Kafr El-Sheikh governorate: 
 
Yes: 807,664 (98.7%) 
 
No: 10,858 (1.3%)
 
Turnout: 920,125 (48%) This figure includes voters not registered in the same governorate, unlike in the 2012 constitutional referendum when constituents were only entitled to cast ballots in their respective governorates.
 
Turnout of 2012 constitutional referendum: (24%)
 
04:09 Below are the aggregated results of 14 governorates out of 27. For more details on each governorate please scroll further down:
 
Yes: 4,298,699 (97.4%)   
 
No: 115,065 (2.6%)
 
Turnout: 4,463,672
 
04:00 Unofficial final results of Upper Egypt's Luxor governorate: 
 
Yes: 218,203 (99.5%)
 
No: 1,038 (0.5%)
 
Turnout: 219,241 (31.2%) This figure includes voters not registered in the same governorate, unlike in the 2012 constitutional referendum when constituents were only entitled to cast ballots in their respective governorates.
 
Turnout of 2012 constitutional referendum: (25.51%)
 
03:53 Unofficial final results of Nile Delta's Damietta governorate:
 
Yes: 404,663 (99%)
 
No:4,093 (1%)
 
Turnout: 411,553 (46.2%) This figure includes voters not registered in the same governorate, unlike in the 2012 constitutional referendum when constituents were only entitled to cast ballots in their respective governorates.
 
Turnout of 2012 constitutional referendum: (36.7%)
 
03:42 Unofficial final results of Upper Egypt's Sohag governorate: 
 
Yes: 579,897 (97.2%)
 
No: 16,478 (2.8%)
 
Turnout: 600,202 (24.1%) This figure includes voters not registered in the same governorate, unlike in the 2012 constitutional referendum when constituents were only entitled to cast ballots in their respective governorates.
  
Turnout of 2012 constitutional referendum: (24.81%)
 
03:33 Unofficial final results of the Suez governorate: 
 
Yes: 132,963 (97.8%)
 
No: 2,949 (2.2%)
 
Turnout: 137,436 (34.66%) This figure includes voters not registered in the same governorate, unlike in the 2012 constitutional referendum when constituents were only entitled to cast ballots in their respective governorates.
  
Turnout of 2012 constitutional referendum: (38.29%)
 
03:30 Unofficial final results of Upper Egypt's Aswan governorate:
 
Yes: 24,8571 (97.8%)
 
No: 5,517 (2.2%)
 
Turnout: 251,588 (28.2%) This figure includes voters not registered in the same governorate, unlike in the 2012 constitutional referendum when constituents were only entitled to cast ballots in their respective governorates.
 
Turnout of 2012 constitutional referendum: (22.28%)
 
03:25 Unofficial final results of Upper Egypt's Beni Suef governorate:
 
Yes: 411,647 (96.2%)
 
No: 16,239 (3.8%)
 
Turnout: 436,932 (29%) This figure includes voters not registered in the same governorate, unlike in the 2012 constitutional referendum when constituents were
only entitled to cast ballots in their respective governorates.
 
Turnout of 2012 constitutional referendum: (37.82%)
 
03:16 Unofficial final results of Upper Egypt's Minya governorate: 
 
Yes: 699,780 (96.46%) 
 
No: 25,694 (3.54%)
 
Turnout: 738,830 (26.3%) This figure includes voters not registered in the same governorate, unlike in the 2012 constitutional referendum when constituents were only entitled to cast ballots in their respective governorates.
 
Turnout of 2012 constitutional referendum: (33.17%)
 
02:59 Unofficial final results of South Sinai governorate:
 
Yes: 60,667 (96.2%)
 
No: 2,402 (3.8%)
          
Turnout: 64,598 (91.2 %) This figure includes voters not registered in the same governorate, unlike in the 2012 constitutional referendum when constituents were only entitled to cast ballots in their respective governorates.
 
Turnout of 2012 constitutional referendum: (28.19%)
 
02:40 Unofficial final results of the northern Egyptian governorate of Matrouh
 
Yes: 42,047(96.2%)
 
No:1,660 (3.79%)
 
Turnout: 44,505 (19.8%) This figure includes voters not registered in the same governorate, unlike in the 2012 constitutional referendum when constituents were only entitled to cast ballots in their respective governorates.
  
Turnout of 2012 constitutional referendum: (32.98%)
 
02:30 Unofficial final results of the Upper Egyptian governorate of Assiut:
 
Yes: 521,505 (96.2%) 
 
No: 20,501 (3.8%)
 
Turnout: 552,027 (24%) This figure includes voters not registered in the same governorate, unlike in the 2012 constitutional referendum when constituents were only entitled to cast ballots in their respective governorates.
 
Turnout of 2012 constitutional referendum: (27.76%)
 
02:20 Unofficial final results of the Suez Canal governorate of Ismailia
 
Yes: 285,688 (98.1%)
 
No: 5,559 (1.9%)
 
Turnout: 294,732  (40.1 %) This figure includes voters not registered in the same governorate, unlike in the 2012 constitutional referendum when constituents were only entitled to cast ballots in their respective governorates.
 
Turnout of 2012 constitutional referendum: (35.77%)
 
01:45 Unofficial final results of the Upper Egyptian governorate of Qena
 
Yes: 360,948 (98.2%)
 
No: 6,522 (1.8%)
 
Turnout: 371,132 (22.1%) This figure includes voters not registered in the same governorate, unlike in the 2012 constitutional referendum when constituents were only entitled to cast ballots in their respective governorates.
 
Turnout of 2012 constitutional referendum: (22.31%)
 
01:24 Unofficial final results of the Red Sea governorate:

Yes: 104,097 (97.1%)

No: 30,33 (2.9%)

Turnout: 107,100 (43.9%) This figure includes voters not registered in the same governorate, unlike in the 2012 constitutional referendum when constituents were only entitled to cast ballots in their respective governorates.

Turnout of 2012 constitutional referendum: (33.13 percent)

01:00 Unofficial final results of the Suez Canal governorate of Port Said:
 
Yes: 228,073 (98.5%)
 
No: 3,387 (1.5%)
 
Turnout: 233,796 (51.57%) This figure includes voters not registered in the same governorate, unlike in the 2012 constitutional referendum when constituents were only entitled to cast ballots in their respective governorates.
 
Turnout of 2012 constitutional referendum: (37.49%) 
 
00:50 Private TV channel CBC reports the results of polling stations in Sahel Selim Town in Upper Egypt's Assiut governorate:
 
Yes: 21,467 (96.03%) 
 
No: 888 (3.97%)
 
00:38 Private satellite channel CBC reports the results of the southern polling station in the canal city of Port Said:
 
Yes: 10,798 (98.37%)
 
No: 179 (1.63%)

00:14 Al-Ahram Arabic news website reports the breakdown of more than 110,000 votes in several polling stations across the country:

Yes: 109,148 (96.7%)
 
No: 2,552 (2.26%) 

23:50 Al-Ahram's Arabic site reports the results of 40 polling stations in Kafr El-Dawar, a city in Nile delta's Beheira governerate:

Yes: 42,951 (97.7%)
 
No: 991 (2.25%)
 
Turnout: 44,272 

23:40 The hometown of Egypt's ousted Islamist president Mohamed Morsi voted overwhelmingly in favor of the constitution. Results from the village of Al-Adwa in the Nile Delta province ofSharqiya, where Morsi was born, sees 703 approve the charter and 36 reject it.

23:20 Initial vote counting in polling stations across Egypt indicate the 'yes' vote will comprise more than 95 percent of ballots.

23:15 Al-Ahram's Arabic site reports the results of six polling stations in Daqahliya governorate, Nile Delta: 

Yes: 8,446 (99.2%)

No: 68 (0.79%)

22:50 Al-Ahram's Arabic site reports the aggregated results of seven polling stations in El-Azia Village, Upper Egypt's Assiut governorate:

Yes: 9,680 (97.47%)

No: 150 (1.5%)

Turnout: 12,500
 
22:25 As expected, vote counting in several polling stations across Egypt indicate that the 'yes' vote would comprise the vast majority of ballot papers. Below are several examples, according to Al-Ahram's Arabic site.
 
-El-Shahid Hosni Abdel Bari School in Upper Egypt's Qena governorate:

Yes: 1114 (98.75%) 

No: 14 (1.24%)

Turnout: 1138 voters

-Polling station number 15 in El-Edwa Village in Nile Delta's Sharqiya governorate:

Yes: 217 (91.9%)

No: 19 (8.05%)

Turnout: 239 

-Gabal El-Nour Elementary School in Upper Egypt's Beni Suef governorate:

Yes: 667 (99.25%)

No: 5 (0.7%)

Turnout: 674

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Welcome to Ahram Online's live coverage of the vote counting for Egypt's 2014 constitutional referendum.

Egyptians headed to polling stations on Tuesday and Wednesday to vote on a newly-amended national charter, which improves upon the 2012 version that was frozen upon the ouster of Islamist president Mohamed Morsi.

As expected, vote counting began right after the end of polling at 9pm CMT on Wednesday. It is widely assumed that the "yes" vote in favour of the constitution will comprise the majority of ballots, given that most of the groups which objected to the referendum, such as the Muslim Brotherhood, announced a boycott and abstained from voting.

A festive atmosphere reigned at most polling stations across the country over the two-day referendum, with voters chanting both for the draft constitution and popular army chief Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi.

Each polling station must announce the results right after the vote counting and is obliged to allow accredited observers and reporters to supervise the process. Polling stations shall also send results to their respective central electoral committees, which would announce aggregated vote counts.

Below is a list of the governorates that voted in the referendum. Results are expected to unfold in the coming hours.

Governorate Number of Voters  Polling stations
Cairo 6,674,865 3,693
Giza 4,518,941 2,527
Daqahliya 3,793,080 2,171
Sharqiya 3,681,587 2,208
Alexandria 3,415,629 1,859
Beheira 3,376,941 1,939
Gharbiya  3,020,674 1,727
Minya 2,808,534 1,595
Qalyubia  2,718,798 1,550
Sohag 2,485,950 1,487
 El-Monofiya 2,298,208 1,310
Assiut 2,219,387 1,293
Kafr El-Sheikh 1,935,985 1,152
Qena 1,676,423 944
Fayoum  1,628,192 931
Beni Suef  1,506,498 931
Aswan 891,699 531
Damietta 891,241 534
Ismailia 735,103 417
Luxor 703,670 411
Port Said 453,377 254
Suez 396,466 224
Red Sea 244, 603 158
Marsa Matrouh 224,385 197
North Sinai 223,533 139
Al-Wadi Al-Gedid 147,525 95
South Sinai 70,845 40
Total 52,742,139 30,317





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20



Bishoy A.
20-01-2014 07:45am
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0+
SEEMS LEGIT LOL
'no' campaigners get arrested for their opinion, and then 98% of voters support the military. Well, they managed to fool the people and bring back the Mubarak days: No freedom of speech, complete control on state media and of course near 100% support. When the media makes a big part of the population believe that the rest are terrorists, and people actually believe it, you know that this country is screwed. Remember, Mubarak use to win "elections" every 4 years with a 99% approval rate. Again, SEEMS LEGIT.
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19



ali
18-01-2014 08:29pm
18-
8+
Dont believe the lies
Some arab observors are saying turnout is actually no more that 11.2%. So obviously the coup regime is playing fraud and is expected.
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Bisho
20-01-2014 07:50am
0-
0+
Someone needs to stop watching egyptian state television...
Haven't you noticed that state television is only reporting one side of the story? When the army took control of the country on july 3rd, they banned all tv channels that didn't belong to them. Now all that you hear is that everyone who opposes Sisi is a terrorist. How can anyone legitimize a media that is controlled by the rulers? We're better than that Egypt.
Allen
18-01-2014 08:47pm
6-
12+
Really??
Who are your "Some Arab observers", the ones that terrorized the Egyptians as they were trying to cast their vote?
18



Farhan
18-01-2014 02:29am
21-
5+
Egyptian fake constitution referendum only receives 38% turnout.
They had all state machinery working for it , they made sure that every body votes "Yes" , but they were only able to pull 38% people, that too with lots of rigged votes and suppression of "no" sayers. So looks like 62% people boycotted this fraud referendum.
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Farid
18-01-2014 01:04pm
4-
20+
Still better
MB's so called constitution from 2012 had only 32,9% turnout... so 67% boycotted it... Still numbers winning against MB's
17



Khalid
17-01-2014 05:31pm
19-
5+
What is the truth...???
What is the truth...? please if any of the Coup Regime supporter/ Egyptian media could tell the world and Egypt.. (1) If refrendum figures are fair and transparent 18 million said Yes,then where the remaining 18 million egyptian that were out for CC on 30th June..?? Either 33 million on 30th June was a lie or CC support droped 50% after June 30 ? and where are the 22 million signatries of the Tamarod ??? Can the media stop is lies now ?
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16



mahmoud omran
17-01-2014 04:30pm
5-
26+
Congratulation
Congratulation from the heart to the salvation of the Egyptian people from the nightmare of the Muslim Brotherhood terrorists
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15



Samantha Criscione
17-01-2014 12:17pm
6-
24+
The turnout was a victory over the Brotherhood's campaign of terror
Somebody commented below that, since most eligible voters did not vote, the boycott won. In fact, the opposite is true. Given the months of terror disguised as protests (attacks on residents, motorists and storekeepers, attacks on and burning of schools, churches and government buildings, etc.) as well as open acts of terror (bomb attacks, murder of policemen, etc.) by the Brotherhood and their subordinates and allies, what is being called a "boycott" was in fact a threat of violence. The message of the so-called boycott was: do not vote, or else! Just as the Brotherhood engages in terror under the guise of 'protests,' and set up terror camps falsely described as 'sit-ins,' this 'boycott' was a clear threat to anyone thinking of voting or helping to run the referendum. That is why judges were given special life insurance policies for working at the polls. That is why more than a hundred thousand troops were on duty. And in fact, some polling stations were attacked, and a bomb was set off on the first day of voting. In going to the polls, people knew they were risking their lives. Given that fact, and given that everyone knew there would be little or no "NO" vote, so that people could tell themselves that it wasn't urgent to vote, the turnout -- including so many women -- was remarkable. And all the more remarkable that people took part with such good spirit. If people had supported the Brotherhood's so-called 'boycott,' the Brotherhood could have organized huge demonstrations everywhere. But in fact the Brotherhood is hated by the overwhelming majority of Egyptians, as polls, starting with the Gallup poll in June 2013, have shown. -- Samantha Criscione
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Reply to Boycott
20-01-2014 02:21pm
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0+
Why they did not vote?
Well said and I would ad that all those who "boycott" the vote were the young generation that were the follower of the Brotherhood.
etal
19-01-2014 04:10pm
2-
0+
Egyptian Vote on Constitution
How do Egyptians put up with the same military rule as the world moves on?
14



J.M.Jordan
17-01-2014 10:18am
5-
14+
To the vast majority: well spoken! You're as smart as I thought!
As to the districts showing up less than under MB rule referendum, tourist offices would be well advised not to favor them.
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13



Nayef
17-01-2014 01:25am
19-
6+
A sensible person
This is how to measure how real this vote was. For Christians and Muslims ask yourself this question. If Jesus or Muhammad were alive today, would they get 97% approval vote in an election? If Jesus or Muhammad could not get 97% approval in Egypt what makes you think realistically that 97% of Egyptians approved this constitution?
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Masry
19-01-2014 05:18pm
0-
2+
You don't get it
This wasn't a vote for a person. This was a vote for freedom. Freedom to practice your religion. Freedom and equality for women. Freedom to think. Who would not vote for freedom. On top of that it was a vote against the brotherhood and terrorism. Who wouldn't vote for that. Despite threats of terrorism the brave Egyptian people stood in long lines to vote yes for freedom no to terrorism.
12



Egyptian
16-01-2014 08:47pm
3-
17+
The brotherhood was banned a long time ago for a reason.
The problem with politics in many countries is that people lied to gain power. Similar to what the brotherhood did during jan-feb 2011 when they said they wouldnt run a presidential candidate or contest more than 25 percent of parliament positions. Politicians need to know that they cant make fools of its citizens and maybe other countries should learn a lesson from Egypt about justice. NO MORE LIES
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11



Ebrahim
16-01-2014 07:55pm
19-
14+
Haha 98%, democratic? Come on, where is the opposition?
Have you ever seen in a well-respected democratic country that a referendum achieve more than 95% yes votes? I have seen this only in thirld world countries where dictatorships are in power. Welcome back under a millitary regime. More dan 90% havent even read the constitution! This explains the way of thinking of some egyptians, where most of the voters were elderly people. There was a total absence of young well-educated people.
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Allen
19-01-2014 08:59am
0-
2+
No kidding?
You can't be serious classifying the brotherhood sheep well educated!! We can see that from the sad language skills. Not to mention lack of debth in any of the thoughts. As for the old people you disrespect are far wiser then you will ever be. That is why they were out there voting for the future of Egypt.

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