Last Update 1:17
Jailbreak trial of Egypt's deposed president Morsi adjourned to 22 Feb
Former president Mohamed Morsi stands trial for collaborating with Hamas and Hezbollah to escape from prison during the January 2011 uprising, murder, and attempted murder of police officers
Ahram Online, Tuesday 28 Jan 2014
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Mohamed Morsi
Snap shot of ousted president Mohamed Morsi in his court appearance today

The jailbreak trial of Mohamed Morsi has been postponed to 22 February as Egypt's ousted president made his second appearance in court since the army overthrew him on 3 July amid mass protests against his rule. 

The first session was held at the Police Academy in Cairo on Tuesday. Morsi, along with other 21 Islamist defendants, spent the session in a sound-proof glass cage that was set up to prevent a repeat of the interruptions they made in their first court appearance last year.

The rest of the defendants, including some 70 Palestinians, are on the run and being tried in absentia.

The ousted president told the court he had been flown to the trial location at 7pm the previous night and insisted he is a political prisoner, not a detainee. "I am the legitimate president of the country," he told the court "and this trial is not legal." The detainees chanted "Down with military rule."

But in a surprise move, he appointed Islamist thinker Mohamed Selim El-Awa as his defence lawyer, who shall represent him in this trial and all three other cases Morsi faces. In a separate trial for inciting violence, Morsi repeatedly refused to appoint a lawyer, saying he did not recognise the court's authority.

El-Awa, a candidate in 2012 presidential election, defended several Muslim Brotherhood members during the reign of longtime autocrat Hosni Mubarak. But he has denied being officially affiliated to the group.

He was also legal advisor to the moderate-Islamist Wasat Party, a close ally of the Brotherhood.

The session was not broadcast live despite an earlier announcement that it would be aired on state-run television. It was broadcast few hours later. 

The date of the trial marks the third anniversary of the prison break that took place during the 18-day uprising against veteran strongman Mubarak in 2011.

"Null, null"

TV footage showed Morsi in white prison garb, nervously pacing back and forth in a cage in the courthouse, alongside other Islamist defendants who shouted "null, null" at the judges, whose legitimacy they refuse to acknowledge.

Morsi also shouted at the judge, telling him: "who are you?" The judge simply said "I'm the head of the Criminal Court" in response.

The charges are linked to the escape of more than 20,000 inmates from three Egyptian prisons during the early days of the 2011 popular revolt. Prosecutors said defendants face charges of damaging and setting fire to prison buildings, murder, and attempting to murder several people and looting prison weapons depots while allowing prisoners from the "Hamas movement, Lebanon's Hezbollah, Jihadists, Brotherhood [members] and other criminals" to break out of jails.

Morsi and 130 co-defendants are accused of "carrying out a plot to bring down the Egyptian state and its institutions." Prosecutors said over 800 fighters from Gaza had infiltrated Egypt, using RPGs and heavy armaments while storming three prisons, abducting four policemen and killing several other policemen and inmates.

The deposed president was flown by helicopter from his prison near the Mediterranean city of Alexandria to the court in eastern Cairo. Other co-defendants were transferred in armoured vehicles from Tora prison on the outskirts of Cairo.

Supporters of army chief Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi attempted to prevent Mohamed Abdel-Fattah and other defence lawyers from entering the premises and verbally abused them, according to Ahram Online's reporter at the scene.

They held aloft pictures of El-Sisi, who is tipped to become Egypt's next president after growing immensely popular since the army's overthrow of Morsi.

The Police Academy was heavily secured but Morsi supporters have not appeared in the vicinity of the court, according to Al-Ahram Arabic news website. The pro-Morsi protesters demonstrated in downtown Cairo instead, clashing with police forces who fired tear gas to disperse them.

The defendants include senior Brotherhood leaders Mohamed Saad El-Katatni, Essam El-Erian, Mohamed El-Beltagy, and pro-Brotherhood preacher Safwat Hegazy.

Morsi also faces three other separate trials for the killing of protesters and colluding with Hamas and Hezbollah to carry out a terrorist campaign in Egypt.

He could face the death penalty if convicted.

Tuesday's trial marks Morsi's second court appearance since his ouster by the military on 3 July amid massive protests against his turbulent year-long rule.

His first public forum since his removal was in November in a trial over inciting violence relating to the deaths of opposition protesters while in office. State television only aired brief footage of Morsi in which he repeatedly shouted "I am the legitimate president."

He missed another trial session on 8 January after bad weather prevented a helicopter bringing him to court, security officials said.



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10



reyhan.k
29-01-2014 10:35pm
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3+
Democracy is a cultural issue, not a form of governmental organization.
In countries with a history of dictators it seems democracy only means you can vote for your next autocrat, who is then able to rule as he pleases and set any agenda in government. If you drop Morsi or add Al-Sisi both have the same mentality,same concept,different flavors,but the same result. It seems the Egyptian elite and liberals want a strange form of democracy: one where only they get to vote.
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9



June
29-01-2014 07:16pm
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0+
Morsi's courtcase
Is there such a word as 'fair trial' Egypt? In the earlier days of Hosni Mubarak's court cases, the trials went back and forth and finally the cases were dismissed like it was a big mistrial. How a person convicted of such enormous funds and crimes can be 'set free'. Hence, I have lost all interests in any updates on Morsi's trails as well. I apologize if I sound sceptical or narrow minded, but I am certain many viewers share my opinion. Looking back, now and in the near future, there is still so much uncertainty and there is no 'real' law that has yet to be established. Currently, I feel that the law is in the hands of the head of the court and not in the writing of the Book.
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8



George michael
29-01-2014 02:44am
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70+
not a dictator, but a national hero
A dictator would not allow for a transition Govt. A dictator would not allow for new constitution. A dictator would not run, he will just take over. A dictator would not be loved by 98% of the population. Mursi was a dictator because he tortured his opposition In the mosques and In the headquarter of the MB He tailored a constitution to his group liking. He ignited hatred between Christians and Muslims leading to burning of hundreds of churches. his followers through children from the roof tops. He conspire against his own nation with Hamas and other countries. he was prepared to give away the Sues canal for money paid to his group by Qatar He was prepared to sell the Sinai desert to Hamas and Al qaedaa. this is a dictator
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7



Moeen Hosni
28-01-2014 11:57pm
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45+
John public
secondly: Israel and the US are not very happy now, but they were very happy during the ousted Morsi era, as he offered his sevice without a request from them, he was a infiltrator against his country for money and authority , the terrorists brotherhood don't know something called "patriotism" thirdly : you can compare Mubark to Morsi you will find that the 1st is full of "patriotism" refused to leave his country and prefered to be put in jail to escape but, Morsy the Traitor is waiting the moment when the jail breaks to escape again but he is building castles in air:)
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6



John Public
28-01-2014 09:02pm
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13+
Sisi, the new dictator
Egypt, now governed by a new dictatorship, same as the old one. I am sure Israel and the US are very happy. Egypt will continue to be a basket case, and in 10 years everyone will suddenly remember what they already know - el-Sisi is corrupt, and is a dictator. Poor Egypt.
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George Michael
29-01-2014 02:36am
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36+
Not a dictator, A national hero
SISI is not a dictator.
5



Moeen Hosni
28-01-2014 08:22pm
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102+
legitimate president
legitimate president is the most famous expression on the year 2013, it reflects that Morsi could not believe that he was the president of egypt!, sas if it was a dream and it turned into nightmare- Hell to the terrorists and their followers
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4



Allen
28-01-2014 07:23pm
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126+
Looks like the terrorists smile has been whipped out.
He looks great in white though. Even better if he got a shave. Just don't let him escape any more. Look how many Egyptians died for this criminal
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Farhan
29-01-2014 07:36am
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3+
Don't Wahabbi criminal money is not going to last long
Than they will have to show real things ot Egypt, till that time they can continue prospects of fake dreamland.
3



Hamam
28-01-2014 03:49pm
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17+
Farcical trial
We all know this trial is farcical. Mursi is the elected President, and those who are trying him ar Israel's agents.
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medo
29-01-2014 11:55am
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28+
@moe
@moe... Do we agree that he was in prison before the revolution and that he along with other terrorists escaped?? Good... glad we can agree on something!
Moe
28-01-2014 10:06pm
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1+
Dictatorship
@medo ... And you mr. Educated .. What is your proof that he's a terrorist and did all that bullsh*t they say he did besides what that government fill your ears and brain with .. Have fun with the dictatorship you gonna live under soon !
medo
28-01-2014 06:11pm
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@hamam
this is the problem with Egypt... too many people like yourself..... uneducated...... and spread false information for the other uneducated to believe.
2



Zamana
28-01-2014 03:37pm
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Morsi long live
Public of ehypt can not trust on court.because from 60years court killing democracy .court always suport criminal army
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1



John
28-01-2014 02:17pm
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10+
Love morsi
The judgs and agents of west with army do not play with morsi.10000 thousands public murdere how become president ofegypt .court must correct his qibla .othervice ?????????????
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Masry
28-01-2014 03:37pm
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103+
Morsi is exactly where belongs
These terrorist need to be brought to justice. They threatened that they would burn Egypt and they will try. However joke we defeated them in the 90's we will defeat them again now. These savages have nothing to do with Islam . They are a power hungry group that used religion as a weapon. Murderrers they will burn in hell inchalla

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