Last Update 5:39
Thursday, 18 January 2018

Egypt's President Mansour reconstitutes Supreme Council of the Armed Forces

The Defence minister, and not the president of the republic, will be head of SCAF for the first time in Egyptian history

Ahram Online, Thursday 27 Feb 2014
Mansour
Share/Bookmark
Views: 5132
Share/Bookmark
Views: 5132

Interim President Adly Mansour has issued a presidential decree reconstituting the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) to be headed by the defense minister and not the president for the first time in Egypt's history, Al-Ahram's Arabic News website reported on Thursday.

The council's vice president is the chief of staff.

The SCAF's new construction sees its members comprised of 23 top military generals from the army, navy, air force, air defence as well as the head of military intelligence.

It is the first time in Egypt's history that the SCAF will not be headed by the president, who is, according to Egypt's constitution, the chief commander of the armed forces, thus giving the military greater autonomy from civil authorities.

The new constitution, passed in January, includes a transitional article which gives the president the right to appoint the defence minister but also gives the SCAF the right to approve of its leader for eight years.

The defence minister decides which of his aides could also become council members.

Field Marshal Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi is currently Egypt's defence minister.

The president has the right to include members in the council as well as invite the council to meet whenever necessary. The president will head meetings that he calls.

The defence minister invites the council for a regular meeting every three months and whenever urgently needed. In case of a national threat or war, the council is considered in a continuous meeting.

Egypt has been ruled by a council of military generals for a total of almost 17 months, after the 2011 uprising which led to the ouster of longtime autocrat Hosni Mubarak, and before the 2012 presidential elections that brought the Muslim Brotherhood’s Mohamed Morsi to power.

Short link:

 

Email
 
Name
 
Comment's
Title
 
Comment
Ahram Online welcomes readers' comments on all issues covered by the site, along with any criticisms and/or corrections. Readers are asked to limit their feedback to a maximum of 1000 characters (roughly 200 words). All comments/criticisms will, however, be subject to the following code
  • We will not publish comments which contain rude or abusive language, libelous statements, slander and personal attacks against any person/s.
  • We will not publish comments which contain racist remarks or any kind of racial or religious incitement against any group of people, in Egypt or outside it.
  • We welcome criticism of our reports and articles but we will not publish personal attacks, slander or fabrications directed against our reporters and contributing writers.
  • We reserve the right to correct, when at all possible, obvious errors in spelling and grammar. However, due to time and staffing constraints such corrections will not be made across the board or on a regular basis.
3



Mostafa
28-02-2014 12:29pm
11-
64+
In principle, wrong. In practice necessary, now now
In principle, this is absolutely wrong. The elected president should have complete control of the armed forces. However, as Morsi has shown us, an elected president is more than capable of using violence against his opponents. Imagine if Morsi had real control over the police and army. Until civilians in Egypt reach the political maturity needed to never have civilian violence, civilians cannot be given control over armed forces. Better to have the danger of an independent army involved in politics than an army used by civilians for politics
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
2



Hasan al Abnodi
27-02-2014 11:01pm
107-
16+
So Sisi is the President and the President is a puppet.
Long live primitive Egypt. This is how we can compete with North Korea and become an African tiger!!!!!
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
1



expat
27-02-2014 08:10pm
94-
58+
so its clear,who is in charge now*smile*
Sisi could have been a little more decent to announce who is in charge,he really didnt have to embarrasse the president this much*lol*to state as president,that he is a puppet
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
Latest

© 2010 Ahram Online.