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Khaled Ali says he won't stand in presidential election

Leftist human rights activist describes the upcoming presidential election as a farce and calls on the army to stay out of politics

Ahram Online , Sunday 16 Mar 2014
Egyptian presidential candidate Khaled Ali
Egyptian presidential candidate Khaled Ali talks during a news conference at his office in Cairo May 21, 2012 (Photo: Reuters)
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Leftist activist Khaled Ali has said he will not stand in the upcoming presidential election.

"I refuse to participate in this farce called an election," Khaled Ali announced at a press conference at the journalists syndicate on Sunday.

Ali, who stood for president in 2012, said there would only be real presidential candidates if the election law is amended, the protest law is cancelled and jailed activists are released.

The army should not get involved in politics, he noted.

"I am not against the army but if its commander wants to be a candidate he should first resign his position and spend two years in politics as a civilian," Ali said.

Army chief Field Marshall Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi is expected to announce his candidacy soon.

Nasserist politician Hamdeen Sabbahi is the only person to state he will stand for president. But the candidate registration process is yet to begin.

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bknot1
17-03-2014 08:38am
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Unjust!!!
Why is everyone calling to end the protest law. It seems to me everyone wants to live in chaos with no restraint for law and order in this Country. They just want to do what they want to do without law. Keep hurting you Country economy, hurting people business and homes becuase of the stupid protesting that keep going every week without law and order. This place is doomed to fail, no matter who is elected. Until everyone gets a clue and make it work it will never work. Nothing is right in Egypt right now..
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Alejandro
19-03-2014 12:33am
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The unbelievable hypocrisy of the protest law
Anyone who supported the Tamarod protest and NOW supports the protest law is being an irrational hypocrite. If you support the protest law, you must by logical extension believe that Morsi would have been justified in mowing down the protests against him without the slightest bit of remorse. In fact, it is not logical to both support the ouster of Morsi and to support the protest law. Pick one.
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John
16-03-2014 06:59pm
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Weak idea
First egyptian must become educated after education they know what is the democracy? BEfore education any step make every one like morsi .how al baradie maked uneducated public fool .if democratic person come again west will send again al baradie
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neil
16-03-2014 06:52pm
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worst
the thing that shocked me the most, is the most flagrant vote-buying in the history of the universe; the 'minister of defence' taking credit for some Gulf building project, instead of the president, prime minister, or the ministers of housing/development. at least it is the most 'transparent' government move in the history of the universe; as the president by acclamation is worried about the non-youth turnout for the last referendum
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Michel Bgoubran
16-03-2014 06:33pm
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Criticism & Sarcasm: a plague in Egypt
In the aftermath of the 2 revolutions, the so-called young generation is divided in more than a couple of dozen parties whose job is to criticize the others and anyone whose name becomes popular for whatever reason. They, themselves have done nothing really constructive towards rebuilding the country. In the last presidential elections, Mr Amr Moussa was fourth after Hamdein Sabahi and I don't recall seeing the name of Mr Khalid Ali at that time. So far, I have seen none of those three get ahead with an idea or proposal to build the country infrastructure and start doing it with his followers. All I hear is criticism and sarcasm. El Sisi never planned to be President, everybody has seen the millions in the street who begged him to be a candidate. I see no veteran politician or a self made one capable to rally the country behind him and if they claim there is one then where is he and what is he?
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Jnlr
16-03-2014 04:23pm
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A worthy man
Out of all the proposed presidential candidates, this guy is the best.
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