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Lebanese PM Saad Hariri arrives in Paris from Saudi Arabia

AP , Saturday 18 Nov 2017
Saad Hariri
File Photo: Resigned Lebanese Prime minister Saad Hariri (Reuters)
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Lebanon's Prime Minister Saad Hariri arrived in France on Saturday from Saudi Arabia, seeking to dismiss fears that he had been held against his will and forced to resign by Saudi authorities.

Hariri is scheduled to meet at midday with French President Emmanuel Macron. 

An Associated Press journalist saw Hariri emerge from a convoy that arrived Saturday morning at his Paris residence, where police stood guard. Hariri walked out of his car and moved straight into the building without speaking to journalists.

Lebanese television showed the prime minister accompanied by his wife Lara al-Azm, but none of his three children appeared.

A French diplomat confirmed Hariri's arrival but would not comment on his plans beyond meeting Macron. It's unclear when Hariri might return to Lebanon.

Before leaving Riyadh, Hariri dismissed as "rumors" reports about his alleged detention in the kingdom. In a tweet, he insisted his stay in Saudi Arabia was to consult with officials there on the future of Lebanon and its relations with its Arab neighbors.

Hariri announced his resignation Nov. 4 in a broadcast from Saudi Arabia, throwing Lebanon into a serious political crisis.

Macron said Hariri will be received "with the honors due a prime minister," even though he has announced his resignation, since Lebanon hasn't yet recognized it.

Hariri's family is expected to have lunch at the French presidential palace.

Macron said he thinks Hariri intends to return to Lebanon "in the coming days and weeks."

The Hariris have long-standing ties to France, Lebanon's onetime colonial ruler.

*This story was edited by Ahram Online

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