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Tuesday, 25 June 2019

Yellow fever kills 32 in Sudan's Darfur

In an outbreak of mosquito-borne yellow fever in the Darfur region of Sudan, thirty-two people die

AFP , Wednesday 31 Oct 2012
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Mosquito-borne yellow fever has killed 32 people in Sudan's conflict-plagued Darfur region this month, the health ministry said in a statement obtained by AFP on Wednesday.

"According to laboratory results, people are affected by yellow fever. The total number affected in the two states is 84, 32 of whom died," the statement said, referring to outbreaks in Central and South Darfur,

The October 30 statement said a vaccination campaign is being prepared.

In the meantime, the ministry has sent blood supplies and medicines to the area, and has a plan to fight mosquitos, it said.

"Now we received some reports from the area saying the situation is stable," the ministry added.

The UN's World Health Organization said the ministry notified it of the outbreak in the districts of Azoom, Kass, Mershing, Nertiti, Nyala, Wadi Salih and Zalingei.

"The federal Ministry of Health, WHO and other health partners are working on the ground to ensure timely containment of the outbreak," a statement said.

There is no specific treatment for the viral illness found in tropical regions of Africa but it can be contained through the use of bed nets, insect repellents and long clothing.

"Vaccination is the single most important measure for preventing yellow fever," WHO said.

In January 2011, 35 people died from yellow fever in Ivory Coast.

Ethnic African Darfur rebels rose against the Arab-dominated Khartoum government in 2003. The United Nations estimates at least 300,000 people died, but the government puts the toll at 10,000.

An estimated 1.7 million Darfur people are still living in camps for the displaced, the UN says.

Violence has eased since the early days of the nine-year-old war but various conflicts persist: rebel-government clashes, inter-Arab and tribal fighting, as well as car-jackings and other banditry.

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