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Saturday, 16 December 2017

Shops close across Yemen in protest against Saleh

Mass business shutdown in Aden, Taiz and Hodeidah with hardly any traffic or pedestrians in the streets after Friday’s demonstrations between pro- and anti-Saleh protesters

Reuters , Saturday 23 Apr 2011
Yemen
Women take shelter from the sun during a rally to demand the ouster of Yemen's President Ali Abdullah Saleh, in the southern city of Taiz April 22, 2011. Yemenis flooded the streets of Sanaa and Taiz on Friday in rival demonstrations for and against President Ali Abdullah Saleh, who gave a guarded welcome to a Gulf Arab plan for a three-month transition of power. REUTERS
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Yemenis boarded up their shops and businesses across the country on Saturday in protest against the rule of President Ali Abdullah Saleh.

Up to 90 per cent of shops, markets and schools were closed in the southern port city of Aden, a Reuters witness said. There were few pedestrians in the streets and almost no traffic.

Many businesses were also closed for the day in the cities of Taiz, Yemen's third city and an epicentre of opposition to the 69 year-old president, as well as the city of Hodeidah on the Red Sea.

Yemenis flooded the streets of Sanaa and Taiz on Friday in rival demonstrations for and against Saleh, who gave a guarded welcome to a Gulf Arab plan for a three-month transition of power.

The proposal of the six-nation Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) calls for Saleh to hand power to his vice president one month after signing an agreement.

He would appoint an opposition leader to lead an interim cabinet charged with coordinating the presidential elections two months later, a Yemeni official said on Friday.

The plan, presented on Thursday, also gives impunity from prosecution to Saleh, his family and aides – a fact abhorred by his foes, who would also have to end protests under the proposal.

Saleh's long-time Gulf and Western allies, concerned that the chaos in Yemen will open more opportunities for ambitious Al-Qaeda militants, are trying to broker an orderly transition after three months of protests against Saleh's 32-year rule.

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