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Monday, 24 April 2017

Rome meet hopes to curb Libya migrant flows

AFP , Monday 20 Mar 2017
Libya-Rome migrants issue
Italian premier Paolo Gentiloni, left, and Libyan Prime Minister Fayez al-Sarraj review the honor guard before their meeting at Chigi palace, in Rome, Monday, March 20, 2017 (Photo: AP)
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Interior ministers from the central Mediterranean were meeting in Rome on Monday to ramp up efforts to curb migration from Libya amid a sharp rise in the number of people attempting the perilous crossing to Europe.

One year after a controversial deal with Turkey to stop migrants setting out across the Aegean Sea for Greece, the EU is trying to set up a similar accord with conflict-hit Libya, despite fierce opposition from human rights campaigners.

Over 3,300 people were rescued from unseaworthy vessels off the north African country over the weekend, bringing the number of arrivals in Italy to nearly 20,000 so far in 2017 -- a significant increase on previous years.

Interior ministers from Algeria, Austria, Germany, Italy, Libya, Malta, Slovenia, Switzerland and Tunisia were taking part in the meeting, along with the European Commissioner for Migration, Dimitris Avramopoulos.

Italy's Interior Minister Marco Minniti said the meeting would focus on "policies of development, social intervention, border control and repatriation" and that he hoped it would lead to "an increasingly shared management of migratory flows".

Libya's UN-backed unity government has requested 800 million euros ($860 million) worth of equipment to help patrol its coast and territorial waters, including radars, boats, helicopters and all-terrain vehicles, according to Italy's Corriere della Sera daily.

There is also talk of a Libya-based operational centre to coordinate rescues in international waters off the North African coast, relieving the burden on Rome, which has been forced to monitor and intervene well beyond its established maritime surveillance zone.

Experts say some of the equipment requested by Libya would fall foul of a UN embargo on arms imports into the country.

Critics also warn against planned repatriations of asylum seekers to a country where allegations of torture, rape and murder are rife.

Around 20 migrants were killed by traffickers earlier this month on a beach in Libya after refusing to get onto a rickety boat for Europe because of bad weather at sea.

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