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East Libyan warplanes hit Tripoli government positions

Reuters , Friday 12 Apr 2019
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Eastern Libyan forces bogged down in street battles in a push to seize the capital Tripoli deployed warplanes on Friday to hit two government positions as more civilians fled fighting.

The Libyan National Army (LNA) forces led by Khalifa Haftar advanced on the coastal city of about 1.2 million people a week ago in the latest conflict of a cycle of anarchy since the 2011 overthrow of dictator Muammar Gaddafi.

But armed groups loyal to UN-backed national unity government led by Prime Minister Fayez Al-Sarraj have so far kept them at bay, with fierce fighting round a disused former airport about 11 km (7 miles) from the center.

On Friday, an LNA warplane bombed the camp of a force allied to Serraj in Zuwara, west of Tripoli towards the Tunisian border, an LNA military source and residents said.

Zuwara is near the Mellitah oil and gas plant, jointly operated by Italy’s ENI and state oil firm NOC, which supplies Italy with gas through the Greenstream pipeline.

An LNA warplane also attacked the only partly-functioning airport in Tripoli, Mitiga, where anti-aircraft opened fire in response, witnesses said. The extent of damage and possible casualties in both places was not clear.

A week of battles has killed 75 people - mainly fighters but also 17 civilians - and wounded another 323, according to latest U.N. tallies. Some 9,500 people have also been forced out of their homes.

As the sound of fighting echoed round their city, residents sought to maintain some normality on Friday.

Some families were eating in cafes next to the fish market where people were stocking up for the weekend.

“We have got used to wars. I fear only in God,” said Yamim Ahmed, 20, who works in a fast food restaurant.

As well as the humanitarian cost, the conflict threatens to disrupt oil supplies, increase migration across the Mediterranean to Europe, scupper a U.N. peace plan, and allow Islamist militants to exploit the chaos.

The United Nations, which had hoped to organize a national conference this month bringing the rival eastern and western administrations together to organize an election, has called for a ceasefire. The United States, G7 bloc of wealthy nations and European Union have also urged the LNA to halt its offensive.

The U.N. health agency said it fears outbreaks of tuberculosis, measles and diarrhea due to poor sanitation, especially among those displaced.

Five ambulances have been hit trying to extract wounded people from the conflict zone, World Health Organization (WHO) representative Dr Syed Jaffar Hussain also told a Geneva news briefing from Tripoli.

The WHO said it had only two weeks of medical supplies available for Tripoli’s hospitals.

Haftar has so far resisted UN pressure to accept a power-sharing, using his leverage as an ally of the West in attempts to stem jihadists in North Africa.

Thousands of migrants, mainly Syrians and other Africans, are trapped in squalid detention centers in Tripoli as the fighting approaches.

Libya is a major transit point for migrants pouring into Europe in recent years, mostly trafficked by smuggling gangs.

“There are reports that some in detention centers have not eaten in days,” tweeted aid agency Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Borders).

*This story was edited by Ahram Online. 

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