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Wednesday, 25 November 2020

In UN debut, Saudi king calls for comprehensive solution on Iran

Reuters , Wednesday 23 Sep 2020
Salman bin Abdulaziz
FILE PHOTO: Saudi Arabia's King Salman bin Abdulaziz attends a virtual cabinet meeting in Neom, Saudi Arabia August 18, 2020. REUTERS
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Saudi Arabia's King Salman bin Abdulaziz on Wednesday called for a comprehensive solution on Iran and disarming its affiliate Hezbollah in Lebanon, and expressed support for US efforts to start talks between Israel and the Palestinians during his first address to the United Nations General Assembly.

He said Iran has exploited a 2015 nuclear deal with world powers "to intensify its expansionist activities, create its terrorist networks, and use terrorism," adding that this had produced nothing but "chaos, extremism, and sectarianism."

"A comprehensive solution and a firm international position are required," he told the 193-member General Assembly in a video statement, prerecorded due to the coronavirus pandemic.

The United States quit the Iran nuclear pact in 2018 with President Donald Trump dubbing it the "worst deal ever." Washington has since imposed unilateral sanctions and asserts that all countries also have to reinstate UN sanctions in an attempt to push the Islamic Republic to negotiate a new deal.

But all the remaining parties to the nuclear deal, including longtime US allies, and 13 of the 15 UN Security Council members say the US claim on UN sanctions is void and diplomats say few countries are likely to reimpose the measures.

"Our experience with the Iranian regime has taught us that partial solutions and appeasement did not stop its threats to international peace and security," King Salman said.

King Salman also said a deadly blast in Lebanon’s Beirut port last month “occurred as a result of the hegemony of Hezbollah ... over the decision-making process in Lebanon by force of arms.”

“This terrorist organization must be disarmed,” he said.

Authorities have blamed the Aug. 4 blast on a huge stockpile of ammonium nitrate stored for years at the port without safety measures.

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