Last Update 22:17
Thursday, 14 November 2019

Anti-euro party could win seats in German vote: Poll

Merkel's conservative Christian Democrats held steady at 38 percent, according to the poll, while their current coalition partner, the pro-business Free Democrats, gained two points to six percent

AFP , Thursday 19 Sep 2013
Share/Bookmark
Views: 471
Share/Bookmark
Views: 471

Germany's upstart anti-euro party AfD could capture seats in parliament in Sunday's general election and scupper Chancellor Angela Merkel's chance of holding on to her centre-right coalition, a new poll indicated.

The new Alternative for Germany (AfD), founded by a professor who believes the single European currency is a disastrous money pit for Germany, scored five percent in the poll by independent institute Insa Thursday.

That figure is the bare minimum required for representation in the Bundestag lower house of parliament. Until now the AfD had been credited with around three to four percent.

Merkel's conservative Christian Democrats held steady at 38 percent, according to the poll, while their current coalition partner, the pro-business Free Democrats, gained two points to six percent.

Pollsters say that the entry of an AfD bloc in parliament would rob Merkel's coalition of a governing majority based on current estimates of its number of seats.

Such an outcome would most likely force her to form a left-right "grand coalition" with the Social Democrats (SPD), who scored 28 percent, up one point, in the latest poll.

Their preferred partners, the opposition Greens, tallied eight percent, making a centre-left alliance under SPD candidate Peer Steinbrueck look out of reach.

The far-left Die Linke reached nine percent but the Social Democrats have ruled it out as a potential partner.

The AfD has been labelled populist in German media and garnered negative headlines for accounting irregularities and some members' reported far-right leanings.

Its main message is that bailout packages for debt-mired southern European countries have made the euro untenable for Germany and called for a return to the deutschmark.

Talk of fresh aid to Greece during the campaign gave it a further boost.

Short link:

 

Email
 
Name
 
Comment's
Title
 
Comment
Ahram Online welcomes readers' comments on all issues covered by the site, along with any criticisms and/or corrections. Readers are asked to limit their feedback to a maximum of 1000 characters (roughly 200 words). All comments/criticisms will, however, be subject to the following code
  • We will not publish comments which contain rude or abusive language, libelous statements, slander and personal attacks against any person/s.
  • We will not publish comments which contain racist remarks or any kind of racial or religious incitement against any group of people, in Egypt or outside it.
  • We welcome criticism of our reports and articles but we will not publish personal attacks, slander or fabrications directed against our reporters and contributing writers.
  • We reserve the right to correct, when at all possible, obvious errors in spelling and grammar. However, due to time and staffing constraints such corrections will not be made across the board or on a regular basis.
Latest

© 2010 Ahram Online.