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Egypt is threatened with removal from global tourism pamphlets

The violence in Tahrir Square has devastated an already rocky tourism sector in Egypt, say industry sources

Dalia Farouk, Ahram Online, Thursday 24 Nov 2011
Aswan
A guard sits beside Fiela Temple in Aswan (Photo: Reuters)
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The head of the Egyptian Federation of Tourism Chambers, Elhami Zayat, has told Ahram Online that Egypt is threatened with being removed from global touristic brochures if there is not an immediate cessation to the violence taking place in Tahrir Square.

"I do not agree with Egypt's minister of tourism who said that the country's tourism is not affected by the Tahrir events," Zayat added.

Zayat explained that while he was in the United States he has witnessed large drop in reservations of tours to Egypt, especially Cairo, Luxor and Aswan.

"The Egyptian government did not support the tourism sector," Zayat said at a press conference Monday. 

"I noticed a lot of fear from many tourism operators when I was in the World Travel Market Conference in London," Thrwat Agami, head of the Luxor Touristic Chambers, told Ahram gate.

On other hand, several owners of hotels in downtown Cairo said that occupancy rates are at a maximum of 15 per cent, and most guests are journalists and TV channel reporters coming to cover the events at Tahrir Square, and parliamentary elections to follow. Tourists are few.

Samy Mahmoud, deputy chairman of the Egyptian Tourism Authority, stated Wednesday that he had received reports from the authority's offices around Egypt's governorates that showed there were many cancellations of trips to Egypt made by tour operators in many countries, mainly Britain, Italy, France and Japan, due to the violence in Tahrir Square since last Friday.
 

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expat
25-11-2011 08:05am
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salafi/moslem brother plans
Hi whats the news? the clashes are not the real problem,the real issue are the freely voiced plans to shift to sharia-according tourism by the both above mentioned very strong political/religious groups if they win the elections, a key industry is threatened to disappear expat
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Karole du Pont
25-11-2011 04:20am
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Who trusts who in democracy?It,s based on asystem of checks and balances
After some time, the hope triggered from the revolution will wear out everybody, Egyptians as well as foreigners, if it is not channeled into a positive outcome constitutionally. Let Egypt get on with the elections and the parties present their programs for the country. Don't you fool yourself into thinking the fate of Egypt will be different because journalists report on the Egyptian revolution. Journalists did report daily on the causalities of the Algerian civil war as if the world really cared. The Islamists were kept away from power and the country's social fabric was torn for years. The average person feels powerless in reading about daily casualties so what is the goal of the Egyptian Revolution: to bring back Egypt on its global agenda or reel always more daily insatisfaction to any future political outcome? A social fabric is guaranteed by the commitment the various national elements have for the global future of everyone in that country. In democracy everyone gets a vote mi
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naz
24-11-2011 08:56pm
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"See the Revolution" Tours
The Egyptian tourist industry needs to shift over to "See the Revolution" tours. They'd make money.
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