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Sunday, 20 October 2019

New closing hours for Egypt shops will save LE6 bn in electricity: Minister

Trade minister claims earlier closing times for the country's businesses will reduce their demand for state-subsidised power, benefiting government coffers

Ahram Online, Sunday 14 Oct 2012
New closing hours for Egypt shops will save LE6 bn in electricity
Late-night shopping in places like Cairo's Talaat Harb Square could be a thing of the past after new legislation (Photo: Al-Ahram)
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Egypt's government's decision to enforce strict new closing times for shops and restaurants will save the country up to LE6 billion ($1bn) a year in electricity, the trade and industry minister has told Ahram's Arabic-language news website.
 
The minister, Hatem Saleh, said earlier closing hours for business establishments would reduce their reliance on state-subsidised electricity, in turn benefiting the state budget.
 
Starting from November, Egypt's shops will have to turn off their lights by 10pm, while cafes and restaurants will have to shut by midnight. Places officially counted as catering for tourists will be exempt, as will pharmacies.
 
Quoted by Ahram on Sunday, Hatem added that the decision, which has faced objections from business owners, is "bold" and that the time is right to implement it.
 
But he added that the success of the new intiative would depend on Egyptian consumers changing their decades-long habit of late-night shopping.
 
Local Development Minister Ahmed Zaki Abdeen warned of harsh penalties for violators but said that business owners who wish to keep their premises open later could apply for a licence from the Ministry of Tourism.
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Concerned Egyptian
17-10-2012 07:06pm
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What about Daylight SavingTime +1hr ? That used to save electricity!!!
The Egyptian Cabinet abolished Daylight Saving Time in April 2011 primarily to make Ramadhan easier in August (and to make themselves popular after the Revolution). The result has been higher electricity consumption in summer which costs billions and culminated in the issues of this year where towns, hospitals etc have been blacked out. Did anyone ever think that this is a very high price to pay to make life easier in a month where staff productivity drops to almost nothing anyway? Put back Daylight Saving Time and reduce electrial consumption and leave shops and restaurants alone.
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Rami
18-10-2012 07:26am
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Excellent
I forgot all about Daylight savings, I think the problem is beyond just electricity here. Do you se whats going on? These people are making poor decisions, its once again a high official making recommendations without knowing the consequences or even have much knowledge on the topic, and being backed up by his colleagues. I can honestly picture someone praising who ever came up with shutting the shops down as if it was the best idea to hit Egypt. Egypt is on the wrong track people. Shutting shops down is one of the many poor decisions later to hit Egypt. My poor country is robbed by the poor minds.
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Mohammad
15-10-2012 08:10am
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Backwards
These idiotic Egyptian leaders thinking shutting businesses will have gains elsewhere. They are clueless to what economical ill side effects this can have. Why not charge these businesses on peak hour rates and raise the price of the electricity for those hours rather then shutting things down. These are supposedly educated members with degrees in economics. Oh I forgot its from Cairo university.
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Bass
17-10-2012 01:36am
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Excellent
Probably the best solution these poor decision making officials can make. On-peak and Off-peak rates. So after 10pm the rates can increase to 40% more then your normal rates, the store owner will then make his own decision on whether or not it would be profitable to stay open. I cant believe they think shutting te entire country down after 10 is a solution to anything. It really makes me wonder if these are educated minds. Iam not kidding, perhaps some of these decisoon making new leaders are in their position because of connections and not due to their education.
Bass
17-10-2012 01:34am
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Excdellent
Probably the best solution this dumb ass government can implement.
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NewEgypt123
14-10-2012 08:53pm
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Right Idea, Wrong Way to Implement It
The government has the right goal in mind with this idea, but has gone about implementing it in a wrong manner. Saving government money by cutting subsidies is a noble cause. However, forcing businesses to shut down at a certain hour will cost private citizens billions and billions. It puts another burden on Egyptian business when we should be helping business. The government should've said that after a certain hour, electricity rates will increase to this much rather than forcing a business to close. In that way, the government can make money to help pay for the cost of the normal hours of operation's electricity subsidy, rather than completely prohibiting businesses from operating. Egypt needs solutions that are specifically tailored for Egypt, not solutions that are half baked. Any person with common sense could have come up with a better plan to achieve the goal which the government plans to do with their plan. Egypt needs an intelligent government, not one that just legislates
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Guest
14-10-2012 06:08pm
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That's reasonable, but
what about street lighting that is on in broad daylight, how much would it save when turned off during daylight hours?
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