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Egypt parliament passes law granting bonus for state workers not subject to civil service law

The bill was passed with 420 MPs voting in favour, 5 MPs voting against, and 19 abstaining

Ahram Online , Wednesday 10 May 2017
Egyptian parliament
File photo: File Photo: A general view of the Egyptian parliament during a working session in Cairo, Egypt (Photo: AP)
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Egypt's parliament approved on Wednesday by a two-thirds majority a bill requiring the disbursal of an annual 10 percent social bonus for civil servants who are not subject to the civil service law, the state-owned MENA news agency reported.

The bill was passed with 420 MPs voting in favour, 5 MPs voting against, and 19 abstaining.

According to Article 1 of the new law, all state workers not subject to the civil service law, which was put into effect in October 2016, would receive a 10 percent bonus from their basic wage.

The bonus is set to be disbursed ahead of the holy month of Ramadan, according to statements made by Minister of Parliamentary Affairs Omar Marawan following the passing of the bill.

Article 5 of the law has faced controversy as it guarantees the bonus only for those not subject to the civil service law, not all state employees.

The House has been divided between supporters and opponents, with minister Marawan arguing in previous parliamentary sessions that the removal of the article would not lead to just wage distribution between civil servants.

The civil service law, which was passed to regulate the performance of more than six million employees in state departments and public authorities, also has controversial provisions.

Labour unions and rights activists have argued that the law could destroy long-held rights such as job security and can put thousands of government workers out of work.

According to the civil service law, basic salaries would constitute 80 percent of overall pay at all government institutions, while bonuses, traditionally dependent on seniority, would be calculated based on performance.

Protesting workers argue that these rules could result in paycuts and other adverse consequences.

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