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After power cuts, Egypt govt calls on citizens to ration electricity
Egyptian government urges citizenry to cut down on summertime use of electricity in hopes of reducing need for periodic power outages
Ahram Online, Tuesday 21 May 2013
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Egypt's electricity ministry on Tuesday apologised for a recent spate of nationwide power cuts, which the ministry attributed to ongoing fuel shortages.

In an official statement, the ministry ascribed recent power outages to "fuel shortages that have made it difficult for allocated generators to keep up with mounting consumption."

Egypt has around 220 electricity generators nationwide, which consume roughly 100 million cubic metres of fuel on a daily basis, according to a recent statement by Electricity Minister Ahmed Emam.

Egypt's state-run National Energy Control Centre, the statement explained, "has been forced to reduce pressure on the national electricity grid, and therefore calls on the citizenry to ration their use of electricity, especially the use of air conditioners and heaters."

Egypt’s national electricity consumption this summer is expected to rise to 29,500 megawatts per day, while the total daily capacity for electricity production currently stands at some 27,000 megawatts.

The statement further stressed that both the ministries of electricity and petroleum were exerting the "necessary efforts" to secure needed fuel.

Egyptians have recently suffered intermittent blackouts during the day, the result of an electricity ministry plan to conserve power during Egypt's hottest months from May to August.

The government is also betting that rising household electricity costs will serve to reduce consumption.

Electricity consumption in Egypt usually surges during the summer, exacerbated both by the hot weather and the Islamic holy month of Ramadan, which this year will fall in July.



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issam hashem
26-05-2013 10:16am
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power supply
yes please notify us in advance when your going to do so it's not just as easy as 1,2,3 please, best regards issam
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Tom
24-05-2013 05:20am
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influence to industry, and the income
This surely affects the industry and tourism, eventually the income of the nation! but at the same time, we should be more aware about the consumption of electricity. Except poor & ordinary people, people use air-conditioners setting very low temperature, leaving the TV and lights of rooms on even if there are none in the rooms... By the way, I saw lights on in the underground corridors of Metro whose exits are closed. They can't turn off the light due to its switch system??
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kat poland
23-05-2013 06:04pm
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Cures for fuel shortages are not price gouging the people
Hey! I got a cure! How about the rich people in charge of your ministries move out of the nation and stop oppressing everybody? You pretty much have destroyed it. Good job!
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Bill
23-05-2013 12:12pm
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Gov't Apologizes, Next Day Cut Electric 4 Hours - No More Apologies Needed
Yesterday power to home was cut from 8 to 10 PM, then again from about 2:30 AM to 4:00 AM. Please do not apologize, I don't want power cut worse than this! My utmost respect goes to Egyptians able to work their customary full speed under such circumstances. My utmost contempt to those 'wise leaders' who act as though power cuts are an accidental dilemma when they know full well it will get no better soon but feel they have to misinform us so the business community and tourists don't panic. The news media needs to do a more transparent effort at providing information even when they know the government officials will not appreciate honest, truthful report absent malice, rumours or propaganda either from government, political opposition, or industry. To counter Col. Nathan Jessup in A Few Good Men, "Not only can we handle the truth, Colonel, we demand the truth."
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5



JB
23-05-2013 08:36am
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Change the lightbulbs
If the government led by example and replaced all of the energy wasting 50 watt halogen lamps (mainly the R16 bulbs used for recessed lighting) with 1-3 watt replacement LED lamps- and encouraged others to do the same, that would immediately reduce the strain on the system. The airports alone use thousands of these wasteful lamps. A hidden cost savings would also come from reducing the heat generated by the halogen lamps, reducing the demand for air conditioning, not to mention that the LED lamps last over a decade without burning out. It's a simple, practical, and very cost-effective measure that can be easily implemented immediately.
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Hana
22-05-2013 01:57am
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notices
If the government plan to cut the power and water supply during the day and night, they should give us (Egyptians and foreigners) a notice beforehand like Singapore and Malaysia so we can prepare for the worst. Not like just simply turn off the power supply. That is the right thing to do as a government.
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Bill
23-05-2013 12:17pm
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Exactly, Hana, governing means managing and communicating
Allowing for the occasional error and mishap consistent with any transition, probably the most difficult challenge for the Morsi presidency is learning how to forecast and communicate, in candor, the coming challenges. Instead, and most aggravating, they deny there is a diesel shortage and then want to blame 'hoarders' then 'apologize for any past errors' while again misleading the Egyptian people and the foreigners. The Morsi presidency can gain a lot by simply coming forward with honest appraisals. Or, the business community can continue their exodus.
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sam
21-05-2013 08:16pm
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lead by example
Lets see the government stop using their aircon in their governmental buildings from the top down starting in Parliament and use public transport instead of their big gas guzzling cars and use other energy saving measures. How can they complain that the population is not willing to suffer if they are not. I bet the ministers that are implementing these power cuts own more aircon units in their family homes than the average citizen that they are forcing these measures on. The government should be looking to resolve this shortfall in a more positive way. If we were short of water would they say that we had to cut back on its consumption too or would they try to improve its supply. The gulf between those that have and have not is growing in Egypt and it will only get uglier if the government doesn't get its finger out and govern. Wake and smell the coffee Morsi. Turn off your aircon units, turn off your lights, switch off ur washing machine and dishwasher and fans and computers and televisions and alarm systems and queue with the rest of us for petrol.Show Egypt true leadership if this is what you expect your people to suffer. Make all your ministers lead by example instead of from their desks and air-conditioned over lit offices.
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Karin
21-05-2013 06:15pm
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conserving power
So, if there is any shortage, we should solve the problem for them, what about more wind turbines and what about solar energie, if they want to they can cover my house in solar panels
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Farid
21-05-2013 05:54pm
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Citizens call on government to think
Dear Mr. Ahmed Emam, why government is wasting energy on street lamps, keeping lights on during the day? Start with those small changes and then ask citizens to join you. Egypt is country of SUN, which is FREE energy - use advantage of it. Install energy saving or LED light bulbs in government and public facilities, give example how to save energy, not demand it.
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