Last Update 20:35
Tuesday, 16 July 2019

When will you resign?

A recent video clip of Prime Minister Hisham Qandil talking about women's poor hygiene causing diarrhoea in children shows he lacks understanding and vision, and must resign

Nader Bakkar , Friday 15 Feb 2013
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Views: 1553

Honesty knows no compliments, and I have previously sent gradual advice to Prime Minister Hisham Qandil.

I spoke about management by objectives, I spoke about crisis maps and I spoke about many other issues with the purpose of nothing else but reform, even if partial, so we could all traverse this critical juncture until the formation of an elected government.  

But it would be naive to use painkillers for stopping the constant and mounting bleed of human and material losses.

I would never let myself fall into rebuking someone for a defect like a stutter or a slip of the tongue because making fun of people for their defects is not a manly thing to do.  

If this famous clip of the Prime Minister being circulated was anything close to this pattern I would have overlooked it right away.

But the problem is in the fact that behaviour reflects thought, and the behaviour of Dr. Qandil in this video reflected nothing but trivial thinking.

And yet, the old Arabic proverb says, “Talk so I can get to know you.” I hesitated a lot before I allowed myself to pick this particular proverb as a base for judging the man.  

But when I watched the clip more than once, I dared, after much hesitation and fear, to take this short video to represent the level of thinking of Egypt's second man.

Dear sir - just how can I trust you to take the right decision in something so crucially important, whose impact will last for years to come if you don’t manage to wrap it up successfully, like the IMF loan, if your bird’s eye view can’t grasp the connection between “personal hygiene” “diarrhoea in children” and something that happened to you on a personal level, in an extremely limited geographic area, and the economic policies which you and your government are to be held accountable for?    

Let me put it to you simply. You wanted to speak about problems that are deeply rooted in Egyptian society like ignorance in general – particularly “hygienic ignorance” - dilapidation of infrastructure, and the deterioration of health care.

But you expressed all this in the worst possible words and you failed to make any kind of link that can give us a good impression about a real vision, something we could count on, for reform.  

Sir, just hand in your resignation, because this is the least you can do for the sake of respecting the trust.  If the trust is given to the undeserving, this is a sign that we are approaching the end of days.  

So hand in your resignation and do something that the President himself has been avoiding for so long without any apparent justification.

Claiming that the time is not right is an invalid argument. The reshuffle that took place eight months ago included eight ministers, all in one go, most of them were in charge of the most sensitive positions in the state and no one (at that time) argued with you about how suitable the time was.  

As for the approaching Parliament, no need to take that as an excuse as well.  If the new government turns out to be promising, I believe that Parliament can simply affirm its trust in it. 

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Egyptian
24-02-2013 04:05pm
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Again, my comment
Where is my comment here as well? Are you that intimidated by it? Please post it.
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Egyptian
23-02-2013 03:26pm
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The Real Question
The real question is: When will Morsi resign? The real problem behind all that you have effectively mentioned is not prime minister Hisham Qandil, for he is only a puppet of a puppet. If the Muslim Brotherhood love Egypt in any way, they will leave political life and return to their main mission which is purely religious. Just like he unintelligently mentioned that "gas and alcohol don't mix", I would also like to unintelligently tell him that "religion and politics don't mix". I am tired of the so-called "Islamists" who keep theorizing that Islam and politics are compatible and they use Turkey, Malaysia, and Indonesia as proof, I would like to tell them that your theories sound just as convincing as communism which failed terribly, and that the nations you claim as being Islamic are politically and legally secular. Read their constitutions.
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Roslyn Ann
17-02-2013 07:21pm
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Totally agree!
Mr Nader, I totally agree with your point of view. Mr Qandil shows a total lack of political maturity in many issues, not just in this particular case. It seems he is a very insensitive man lacking in diplomacy and how to express himself without directing insults at the poorest in our society. Do we know the conditions of how these women are living, do we know if they even have running water or any basic facilities necessary for cleanliness! Has Mr Qandil even observed these women feeding their children? If he observed such conditions, he should have spoken to the health ministry who could have discreetly investigated this issue, rather than make such a public statement. Mr Qandil is a total embarrassment inside and outside of Egypt.
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mohammed moiduddin
16-02-2013 10:10pm
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When you point a finger, 4 come back to ourselves
The problem is power and greed. All the parties want a say and no one willing to compromise. If someone disagrees they boycott, walkout, or protest. Thats not democracy, you need to compromise and build grassroots in elections. MB won the election, let them govern with their cabinet. If they are bad vote for new ones.
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Ahmed M Ibrahim
16-02-2013 10:57am
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The flickering candle
Prime Minister Qandil is a flickering candle in the dust storm created by the vandalism of fanatical minds. Those who are demanding his resignation should try to feel the humiliation and agony he has underwent for no fault of his own. To correct a mistake is not a crime. Hygiene should be taught in the proper perspective and in the forthright terms by the concerned health authorities. If they are failing in their duties, the Prime Minister has a right to rebuke them and tell the truth in no uncertain terms. Qnndil should not be sacrificed for the crime of others.
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shams ismail
16-02-2013 09:41am
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Qandil must resign
Mr nader ....you're indeed nader .
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Ayman Shokry
16-02-2013 08:42am
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Another point of view!
Brother Nader, ASA, let me just suggest that you guy help bring some degree of calm to the political climate first. I really don't see how your proposal will be effective and expeditious to bring economic reform and quickly rebuild establishments!! You guys are in race against time, if you will. The absence of your Parliament House of Representative is actually part of the problem. It is wise let people elect their representatives and the evaluate the performance of the government using fare and just criteria. Any ministry now are simply putting fires....that's all. You guys don't have processes. In thing in Egypt pretty much spontaneous and reactive as opposed being proactive! Why do you think Hisham Qandil or any body else will be any different?!!
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Nora
16-02-2013 06:27am
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Resign for a clip??? it is not that simple.
Point fingering at descent government officials is the last thing we need. Only a fool would hang all Egypt problems on few individuals. Managing by objectives, and metrics are all fine buzz words, but you are missing the big picture. In mathematics, the science of Integration holds the truth behind Egypt problems. Egypt is as good as the average citizen. The productivity, work ethics, trained work force, and corruption levels are some of the metrics that can't be solved in four months. Consider how dump the average person is, then remember that 50% of the population is dumper. We have to define our baseline (where we are) honestly. The problem is not in the government, it is with us. The entire so society needs refurbish. It is much more than democracy and all these touchy feely issues. It is time to put your head down and work hard.
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