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Wednesday, 16 October 2019

No reconciliation; prosecute them and cure them

Reconciliation with the so-called Islamist Right is tantamount to aborting the map of the future, borne of the second wave of the people’s revolution, and turning back the clock

Nader Fergani , Wednesday 23 Oct 2013
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Mediation between the Brotherhood and the interim regime in this second transitional phase has become a huge construct and a popular trade for those who have nothing better to do, and are unrelated to the issue. I understand that some have good intentions, but there are also others who, seeking a place for themselves that they do not deserve on the political stage, pander to the regime – irrespective of who is in power. They chase after rewards from one party or another.

What is unusual in the last attempt at what is described as reconciliation -- especially since the volunteer mediator is, this time, a law professor -- is that it was launched after the courts decided to dissolve the 'Misguided Brotherhood' and its affiliates.

What is truly surprising and reprehensible is that this mediation began after it became apparent that the Brotherhood is teetering and close to collapse. It is steadily losing the support of the public, and thus its ability to mobilise and order demonstrations which have become unpopular with the citizenry.

All that is left in its criminal artillery is heinous armed terrorism in Sinai that views society as infidel. Meanwhile, the roadmap is making progress and the Committee of 50 will soon finalise the draft constitution that purifies the contaminated constitution of the so-called Islamist Right, which they stole in 2012.

I believe the sole purpose of this mediation effort is to save the Misguided Brotherhood and the entire so-called Islamist current from an inevitable fate they brought upon themselves through their arrogance and tyranny when in power and through their crimes after the overthrow of their regime. This mediation appears to tear, or will hinder, the map of the future that crowned the second grand wave of the great people’s revolution.

It’s a good thing this initiative failed at the onset, and on principle we should not welcome any moves that do not primarily aim to raise the dignity of the people of Egypt and the esteem of the country – which has proven not to be a priority for the so-called Islamist current.

Giving the so-called Islamist Right the kiss of life means aborting the map of the future that was born after the second grand wave of the great people’s revolution. All mediators who do not have these honourable patriotic goals as their priority should refrain from trying, and any group that is astray or political faction that does not adopt these goals – and their mediators – should be ousted or quit.

Perhaps there was room for reconciliation, as nobly noted in the plan for the second transitional phase right after the declaration of the roadmap for the future, had the so-called Islamist Right repented, reversed and returned to the national fold. I emphasise that all the factions of the so-called Islamist Right are intent on overturning the map of the future – led by the Misguided Brotherhood – just as they were while in power; the current rules and directs society led by the Brotherhood.

The same is true in sabotaging the map of the future and terrorist attacks: the Brotherhood at the helm and the rest of the current in a supporting role – even if some of these roles include occasional superficial criticism of the Brotherhood.

I am surprised at how elaborate these groups are in their obscenity and maligning of the state and people, and why these talents were not put to work on reform and renaissance when they were in power.

The notion of reconciliation is inherently gravely defective since it assumes there are two equal sides that had a misunderstanding or are mutually at fault, which is far from the truth. On one side is a country, people and state, and on the other is a fascist political faction that maliciously peddled Islam in a way that insulted both the great religion of Islam and the dear homeland. They reached power through fraud, luring the simple folk and terrorising them with religion, and then tried to destroy the state and sell the country as rubble to its enemies.

Had it not been for God’s mercy for the Land of Egypt, the alertness of its people and valour of its Armed Forces, their malicious plot would have succeeded. After the people overthrew them in the second grand wave of the great people’s revolution, they responded with loathsome violence, vile armed terrorism and urged foreigners to attack the country they claim to belong to. This is the threat that the deputy supreme guide of the Misguided Brotherhood issued to Defence Minister General El-Sisi when the latter was negotiating with them for sake of the country before 3 July. This was the incitement of all the leaders of this terrorist organisation -- which has been criminal since its inception.

The interim powers were generous, perhaps overly generous, and took the risk of destroying the map of the future and the future of the country when they permitted dozens of attempts to close the gap through numerous mediations by foreign and Arab politicians. The dispute is primarily caused by the intransigence of the so-called Islamist Right leaders and their refusal to submit to the will of the people, their intent to punish the people for expressing their will to overthrow their regime, and their sabotage of the map of the future that the people want – with the help of their Armed Forces.

It is pitiful and ironic that these high-level mediations crashed on the cliffs of the arrogance of the leaders of this current and their demand to turn back the clock to exactly what the people rose up against – tyranny, arrogance and corruption across the country. Their constant refusal to carry out reforms demanded by the people was also a key factor for their downfall.

They obviously do not learn from their mistakes, even if their own heinous deeds were the reason. They are mental patients who need to be cured; they have every right to treatment after the criminals among them are prosecuted. Perhaps then they would repent for their heinous actions. We welcome anyone who recovers as a dear brother in our dear homeland, and anyone who committed a crime should still be treated as a human being whose human rights are protected beginning with a fair and just trial.

Accordingly, the notion of conciliation after all this obstinacy and criminal activity by the so-called Islamist Right seems ridiculous or, at the least, very naïve. Conciliation cannot be achieved with those who took up arms against their innocent fellow citizens and spilled the blood of Egypt’s honourable soldiers, as if nothing had happened. They spilled blood, injured the innocent and killed martyrs, even among their own ranks, and are intent on sabotaging the country.

Nonetheless, there are still those who talk of conciliation. The Brotherhood committed all these crimes in public, documented incitements and actions by the leaders of the current. The Prophet said: “He who raises a weapon against us is not one of us.” They should be prosecuted swiftly before any other steps are taken and all those at large must be arrested promptly. They must all be put on trial without delay and receive deterrent punishment, and those who want to be cured should be intellectually and psychologically rehabilitated. The lower ranks of the snake must also meet the same fate – perhaps the courts will excuse them for being blindsided, needy or lacking resources.

While it is true the so-called Islamist Right has many followers, most of them are misguided, and many who participated in their non-peaceful and criminal activities are hired mercenaries. Other followers were misled and made mistakes, but did not commit crimes. Perhaps they are still living under illusions and delusions such as “Morsi will be back, God willing” and “6 October is the last day” – even though many days have passed since without their delusions coming true. As for those who were paid to participate in their demonstrations, they are also sick and need to be cured.

Thus, the transitional ministries of health and justice should prepare to administer an effective cure to them all, and the entire cabinet should prepare to economically rehabilitate anyone who needs it.
 

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15



Daryl Glaser
04-11-2013 10:26pm
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Written by Goebbels?
This column is written in the style of Nazi or Soviet-style propaganda, as any fair and intelligent observer can quickly tell. As an account of reality it is worse than useless, completely bereft of serious argument or evidence. What an embarrassing degradation of the great craft of journalism, and shame on Al Ahram for giving it a platform in the midst of Egypt's totalitarian crackdown on dissent.
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14



Minal Shannuda, Cairo
29-10-2013 09:33pm
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uncultured, fanatical and intolerant
This man calls for exclusion from public life and politics of those who disagree with him. For those who don't know, this is the gist of fascism. It is a shame you allow him to corrupt the public discourse with his ignominious screed. Civilized nations passed this point of contention many decades ago. Which means the writer represents the most uncultured, fanatical and inhuman aspects of the Egyptian society.
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13



George Sedqi, Imbaba, Cairo
29-10-2013 09:25pm
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haters of reconciliation with the MB
Those who don't want reconciliation with the MB include the following: 1-the army and Interior Ministry: these people have their hands soaked in blood, having unlawfully murdered thousands. 2-the Coptic Church which harbors relgious hatred for anything Islamic. 3-extreme secularist and liberal parties which would lose any comig elections.
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12



Hala Sirhan
29-10-2013 01:02pm
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Shame!
It is a shame that you allow fascists like this author to spew his venom here while you deny other writers who criticize the criminal Junta the right to publish their views?
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Nabil Mursi
29-10-2013 09:19pm
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fascist liberals
Yes, I think Hala has a point? Where is the multiplicity of ideas that express democracy. I think the liberals and secukarists are more fascist than their enemies.
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George Saber, Cairo
28-10-2013 07:45am
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Fascism doesn't build society
I think Fergani represents the hard core of fascism in Egypt. What he is saying is pretty clear: Either you agree with me or you are mentally sick and needs intelletual and psychological rehabilitation. In truth, it seems the writer himself and no one else, needs help. Fascism doesn't build societies. It destroys them.
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10



Miguel
27-10-2013 11:21am
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The mote and the beam
Dear Mr Fergani, I would like you to explain to the readers what you mean by "being intellectually and psychologically rehabilitated" or "curing them". How exactly do you think this should be done? I am sorry to say that it sounds to me like a call for reeducation camps or Soviet-style use of psychiatry to eliminate dissidents...Pretty fascist idea if you ask me (The mote in your brother's eye and the beam in your own and all that stuff) Holding different views on certain topics is not a disease, as you seem to suggest in your article, but part of human nature. Whether you agree or disagree with those views is quite another matter. It seems to me that you're trying to wrap yourself in the flag of democracy to justify the forcible elimination of dissent, which is one, if not the most important,of the cornerstones of democracy. The MB may be wrong and their current demand that Mursi be reinstated may be unrealistic, but they have a right to say what they think (just like you do, even though I think you're introducing some dangerous ideas) and to demand what they please. Given the current polarization in Egypt, adding fuel to the fire, blaming the MB for the seven plagues,and using incendiary rhetoric is, in my opinion, doing a disfavor to a country that needs, above all, stability in order to achieve the goals of bread, social justice,and freedom. And that's where reconciliation comes into play. Why are you, Mr Fergani, so afraid of reconciliation? I think any reconciliation initiative should be taken into consideration and any attempt to reduce political polarization through peaceful means and dialogue and broker a deal between the parties should be applauded. Because the fact of the matter remains that all Egyptians (seculars, Islamists, salafis, communists, Christians, Shiites...) will eventually have to live together and the sooner the better.
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9



Ahmed M Ibrahim
26-10-2013 10:37am
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No Reconciliation
Reconciliation had some meaning and substance, when the Morsi and his combine had grabbed power and all other political forces were being trampled in the most undemocratic manner. Morsi and his combine never listened to reason and logic. Had he taken some steps to create a political situation wherein politicians of all shades irrespective of any discrimination should have been allowed to participate in the political process, Egypt have been saved from much of the misery. But Morsi never listened to reason. He had the backing of elements who wanted to create a Somalia in Egypt by dividing and destroying the country in the name of political Islam. The events of 30th June saved Egypt from an impending disaster. Now there could be no reconciliation with enemies and traitors. The Law of the country will deal with them.
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George Idris
29-10-2013 09:09am
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No to fascism, no to military state
Mursi "grabbed" power through the ballot box not by murdering 5000 people at Rabaa.
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Sam Enslow
26-10-2013 08:30am
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The answer is ecomomic and social inclusion of all
I have no use for The Brothers or "Islamic politics". Religion and politics must be separated or both become corrupt. The "religious" who enter politics remind me of Rumi's, "If you thirst you drink water from a cup and will see God's face in it. If you do not love God you will see your own face." Religious politicians often mistake their goals and ambitions for God's. But I am also reminded of another quote, "The proof of the pudding is in the eating." Everyone seems to want to forget the 25 January revolution and its demands. But until there is social justice, the rule of law, and economic justice (and mobility) for all, the Islamists will find supporters. Slogans do not put bread on people's tables. Jobs do. Hope helps those who must endure hardship, and they will endure it if they can see the end. The people will support Egypt only when they believe they are a true part of Egypt. It still remains, "I love Egypt, but Egypt doesn't love me." It is vitally important the elites get the message of the 25 January Revolution. Old games will no longer work. Even today in coffee shops, I am told, "They are all actors. This is the revolution where nothing changed." I asked a shopkeeper if he still had to pay "sweets" to stay open, "That is a problem for the next revolution." The government still operates in secrecy (with help from the press). This adds to mistrust by a people who do not trust government in the first place, "They are playing the same old games, protecting themselves." The Brothers, once in power, were considered the same or worse. The elite still do not listen to the people. They want to tell the people what to do, to rule - not govern - Egypt. At least that is the perception, and in politics perceptions can be far more important than reality. Only when all the people of Egypt down to street children believe they are a true part of Egypt will Egypt be free of extremism and able to attain the goals of the 25 January Revolution.
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7



Leslie Smith
26-10-2013 03:00am
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A reader of Ahram in English
This essay is a recipe for a civil war in Egypt. There can be no true democracy in Egypt unless all parts of Egypt’s society has a full and credible hand in shaping Egypt’s future. Trying to destroy parts of Egypt’s society just because you do not agree with them is a dead end road that will never get Egypt to a fair and just republic.
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6



jawid
26-10-2013 12:40am
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coup supporter
This writer living has no idea what he is talking about. It appears he is completely away from reality. This coup supporter don't have any idea about justice, civil society and crime committed by the military puppet Govt. Such people would be brought to justice one day.
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