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Thursday, 29 June 2017

District of Columbia contestant named Miss USA

Kara McCullough, who holds a degree in chemistry , triumphed over 50 other contestants

Reuters , Tuesday 16 May 2017
Reuters
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A 25-year-old scientist representing the District of Columbia was crowned winner of the Miss USA pageant , the second consecutive year that the contestant from the  capital of the USA won the annual competition.

Kara McCullough, who holds a degree in chemistry and works at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, triumphed over 50 other contestants, including first runner-up Chhavi Verg, representing New Jersey, to claim victory in the contest which was held at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas.

Reuters

For her question as one of three finalists, McCullough was asked about healthcare rights, and replied that affordable healthcare was a privilege for people who held jobs. The response drew some stinging criticism on social media platforms such as Twitter, but also had its defenders.

"Twitter is like a war zone," posted one user, referring to opposing reactions to the winner's remarks.

McCullough also took hits for saying she does not call herself a feminist, preferring "equalism," before adding "Women, we are just as equal as men, especially in the workplace."

The pageant's other finalist, Meridith Gould, represented Minnesota.

McCullough will go on to compete as the U.S. representative at the annual Miss Universe pageant

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