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Wednesday, 21 August 2019

Interior design and the new black

Expressions of dark home decor revisited

Amany Abdel-Moneim, Friday 9 Aug 2019
Black decor
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Views: 683
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Views: 683

Furnishing a new home? Renovating an old one and need colour inspiration? At some point or another, we’ve all been there: how to choose the best colours and how to use them appropriately is always a confusing issue. According to experts, colour is the backbone of design and can instantly transform any space.

The new black
The new black

Though white walls seem to be a designer’s secret weapon to make small rooms seem larger and large rooms appear airier and cooler, black walls are now the latest decorating trend. Black may not be a colour you would immediately jump to when picking out a paint shade, but why not reconsider choosing this magical colour? Moreover, before you go for bold patterns, it’s also important to remember that less can be more and can be more impactful. Whatever your favourites from any trends are, interior designers prefer to lean towards minimalism.

The new black
The new black


Here are some new expressions of dark home décor:


Bold black bathrooms: 

The new black

The spa-inspired bathroom has officially returned. Nowadays, it’s all about bold, dark, sultry bathroom designs that evoke an indulgent high-end experience. 

Dark walls: 

Black has proven itself to be a design staple to stay this summer. It’s in every texture and finish, from velvet and leather to natural wood and heavy rug weaves. Black is convenient for a base colour and to add depth to any space as well.

*A version of this article appears in print in the 9 August, 2019 edition of Al-Ahram Weekly under the headline: Interior design and the new black
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