Last Update 18:41
Wednesday, 21 August 2019

Swine flu starting to show resistance to drugs

A novel variant of swine flu has emerged with a genetic adaptation giving some resistance to Tamiflu and Relenza, the two mainstay drugs used to tackle the disease

Reuters, Friday 10 Jun 2011
Share/Bookmark
Views: 1137
Share/Bookmark
Views: 1137

Researchers said more than 30 percent of H1N1 swine flu infection samples from northern Australia and more than 10 percent of those in Singapore, collected during the early months of 2011 had mildly reduced sensitivity to the two drugs.

There was no significant reduction in sensitivity to peramivir, an experimental flu drug from BioCryst Pharmaceuticals.

The new variant has also been detected in other parts of Asia-Pacific, according to a report by the World Health Organization (WHO).

H1N1 flu was discovered in Mexico and the United States in March 2009 and spread rapidly across the world. The WHO believes about 18,450 people died from the virus up to August 2010, including many pregnant women and young people. The WHO declared the pandemic over in August.

Swine flu has not gone away, however, and seasonal flu vaccines being offered across the world include for the H1N1 strain. Flu vaccines are made by several drugmakers including GlaxoSmithKline, Sanofi and Novartis.

Short link:

 

Email
 
Name
 
Comment's
Title
 
Comment
Ahram Online welcomes readers' comments on all issues covered by the site, along with any criticisms and/or corrections. Readers are asked to limit their feedback to a maximum of 1000 characters (roughly 200 words). All comments/criticisms will, however, be subject to the following code
  • We will not publish comments which contain rude or abusive language, libelous statements, slander and personal attacks against any person/s.
  • We will not publish comments which contain racist remarks or any kind of racial or religious incitement against any group of people, in Egypt or outside it.
  • We welcome criticism of our reports and articles but we will not publish personal attacks, slander or fabrications directed against our reporters and contributing writers.
  • We reserve the right to correct, when at all possible, obvious errors in spelling and grammar. However, due to time and staffing constraints such corrections will not be made across the board or on a regular basis.
Latest

© 2010 Ahram Online.