Last Update 20:11
Thursday, 21 September 2017

Parental smoking linked to genetic changes in kids with cancer

The study gives evidence of the toxic effects of tobacco smoke in the genes of the leukemia cell

Reuters , Monday 10 Apr 2017
(Reuters)
Share/Bookmark
Views: 4768
Share/Bookmark
Views: 4768

Parents who smoke may contribute to genetic changes in their kids that are associated with the most common type of childhood cancer, a recent study suggests.

Some previous research has linked parental smoking to an increased risk of childhood leukemia, but with less consistent results for mothers than for fathers. The current study is the first to link smoking by both parents to specific genetic changes in tumor cells of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), said lead study author Adam de Smith, a researcher at the University of California San Francisco’s Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center.

“Another way of looking at this is that we are seeing evidence of the toxic effects of tobacco smoke in the genes of the leukemia cell, a molecular type of forensic pathology,” de Smith said by email.

“These deletions are not inherited from parents but are acquired in the child’s immune cells, so we think the more important windows of tobacco exposure are during pregnancy and after birth,” he added.

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is a cancer that starts from the early version of white blood cells called lymphocytes in the bone marrow, the soft inner part of the bones where new blood cells are made. With this type of cancer, the bone marrow makes irregular lymphocytes with errors known as deletions in their DNA, causing unchecked growth that crowds out healthy cells.

For the current study, researchers examined data on pre-treatment tumor samples from 559 ALL patients in a study of childhood leukemia cases in California. They wanted to see if any of the eight genes that are often deleted in ALL patients were missing in the tumor samples, and whether any of these deletions were associated with parental smoking habits.

Roughly two thirds of the tumor samples contained at least one of these deletions, the study in Cancer Research found.

Deletions were considerably more common in children whose mothers had smoked during pregnancy and after birth. For each five cigarettes smoked daily during pregnancy, there was a 22 percent increase in the number of deletions; and for each five cigarettes smoked daily during breastfeeding, there was a 74 percent increase in the number of deletions.

Smoking of five cigarettes daily by the mother or father before conception also was associated with a 7 percent to 8 percent increase in the number of deletions.

Boys were found to be more sensitive to the effects of maternal smoking, including smoking that occurred pre-conception. This could be explained by the fact that male fetuses grow more rapidly, leading to increased vulnerability of developing lymphocytes to toxins that cause genetic damage, the authors note.

Short link:

 

Email
 
Name
 
Comment's
Title
 
Comment
Ahram Online welcomes readers' comments on all issues covered by the site, along with any criticisms and/or corrections. Readers are asked to limit their feedback to a maximum of 1000 characters (roughly 200 words). All comments/criticisms will, however, be subject to the following code
  • We will not publish comments which contain rude or abusive language, libelous statements, slander and personal attacks against any person/s.
  • We will not publish comments which contain racist remarks or any kind of racial or religious incitement against any group of people, in Egypt or outside it.
  • We welcome criticism of our reports and articles but we will not publish personal attacks, slander or fabrications directed against our reporters and contributing writers.
  • We reserve the right to correct, when at all possible, obvious errors in spelling and grammar. However, due to time and staffing constraints such corrections will not be made across the board or on a regular basis.
Latest

© 2010 Ahram Online.