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Wednesday, 16 October 2019

Looking old may be sign of greater heart risk: Study

New research suggests direct link between signs of aging – receding hairlines, creases near earlobes, etc – and heart disease

AP, Thursday 8 Nov 2012
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Want a clue about your risk of heart disease? Look in the mirror.

People who look old – with receding hairlines, bald heads, creases near their ear lobes or bumpy deposits on their eyelids – have a greater chance of developing heart disease than younger-looking people the same age do, new research suggests.

Doctors say the study highlights the difference between biological and chronological age.

"Looking old for your age marks poor cardiovascular health," said Dr Anne Tybjaerg-Hansen of the University of Copenhagen in Denmark.

A small consolation: Wrinkles elsewhere on the face and gray hair seemed just ordinary consequences of aging and did not correlate with heart risks.

The research involved 11,000 Danish people and began in 1976. At the start, the participants were 40 and older. Researchers documented their appearance, tallying crow's feet, wrinkles and other signs of age.

In the next 35 years, 3,400 participants developed heart disease (clogged arteries) and 1,700 suffered heart attacks.

The risk of these problems increased with each additional sign of aging present at the start of the study. This was true at all ages and among men and women, even after taking into account other factors such as family history of heart disease.

Those with three to four of these aging signs – receding hairline at the temples, baldness at the crown of the head, earlobe creases or yellowish fatty deposits around the eyelids – had a 57 per cent greater risk for heart attack and a 39 per cent greater risk for heart disease compared to people with none of these signs.

Having yellowish eyelid bumps, which could be signs of cholesterol build-up, conferred the most risk, researchers found. Baldness in men has been tied to heart risk before, possibly related to testosterone levels.

Researchers could only guess why earlobe creases might raise risk.

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