Last Update 18:7
Warnings linking Facebook use and teen depression
Add "Facebook depression" to potential harms linked with social media, an influential doctors' group warns, referring to a condition it says may affect troubled teens who obsess over the online site
AP, Thursday 31 Mar 2011
Share/Bookmark
Views: 2978
teen

Researchers disagree on whether it's simply an extension of depression some kids feel in other circumstances, or a distinct condition linked with using the online site.

But there are unique aspects of Facebook that can make it a particularly tough social landscape to navigate for kids already dealing with poor self-esteem, said Dr. Gwenn O'Keeffe, a Boston-area pediatrician and lead author of new American Academy of Pediatrics social media guidelines.

With in-your-face friends' tallies, status updates and photos of happy-looking people having great times, Facebook pages can make some kids feel even worse if they think they don't measure up.

It can be more painful than sitting alone in a crowded school cafeteria or other real-life encounters that can make kids feel down, O'Keeffe said, because Facebook provides a skewed view of what's really going on. Online, there's no way to see facial expressions or read body language that provide context.

The guidelines urge pediatricians to encourage parents to talk with their kids about online use and to be aware of Facebook depression, cyberbullying, sexting and other online risks. They were published online Monday in Pediatrics.

The academy guidelines note that online harassment "can cause profound psychosocial outcomes," including suicide. The widely publicized suicide of a 15-year-old Massachusetts girl last year occurred after she'd been bullied and harassed, in person and on Facebook.

Facebook is where all the teens are hanging out now. It's their corner store, the benefits of kids using social media sites like Facebook shouldn't be overlooked, however, such as connecting with friends and family, sharing pictures and exchanging ideas.





Short link:

 

Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
Ahram Online welcomes readers' comments on all issues covered by the site, along with any criticisms and/or corrections. Readers are asked to limit their feedback to a maximum of 4000 characters (roughly 200 words). All comments/criticisms will, however, be subject to the following code
  • We will not publish comments which contain rude or abusive language, libelous statements, slander and personal attacks against any person/s.
  • We will not publish comments which contain racist remarks or any kind of racial or religious incitement against any group of people, in Egypt or outside it.
  • We welcome criticism of our reports and articles but we will not publish personal attacks, slander or fabrications directed against our reporters and contributing writers.
  • We reserve the right to correct, when at all possible, obvious errors in spelling and grammar. However, due to time and staffing constraints such corrections will not be made across the board or on a regular basis.
4



Bill
02-04-2011 12:04am
0-
0+
Facebook Depression
Hi, Nice post about Facebook usage. I just wrote an article summing up a whole bunch of different studies and surveys about Facebook addiction, the concept of frenemies, and why depression and other things affect heavy social media users. Here’s the link if you want to check it out: http://wp.me/p1fNJu-cv We’re also conducting a survey on Facebook usage, check it out here: http://www.surveytool.com/responders/index/id/1538
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
3



chevouy vassianna
31-03-2011 04:06pm
0-
0+
english
that is true
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
2



hari
31-03-2011 01:56pm
0-
0+
Warnings linking Facebook use and teen depression
read it
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
1



rubab
31-03-2011 01:51pm
0-
0+
to u
kiouyn
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment

© 2010 Ahram Online. Advertising