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Sunday, 26 May 2019

New discoveries at Tharo military fortress, North Sinai

The Tharo military fortress, dating from the New Kingdom period, was once used by military forces to safeguard Egypt's eastern borders

Nevine El-Aref , Tuesday 5 May 2015
Egypt
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An Egyptian excavation mission uncovered two lintels on the eastern gate of the Tharo military fortress in North Sinai, Egypt's minister of antiquities announced on Tuesday.

Mamdouh Eldamaty revealed that the lintels are made up of three limestone blocks and are engraved with scenes depicting King Ramses II from the New Kingdom period. Each block is three metres tall and one meter in width, indicating that the fortress' gate was very large.

Eldamaty explained that from this fortress, Egypt's military forces used to flock out to safeguard the country's eastern borders on Horus military road that once connected Egypt to Palestine.

The mission also unearthed a collection of mud brick store houses which were used during the reigns of kings Tuthmosis III and Ramses II. A collection of stamps bearing the name of king Tuthmosis III were also uncovered.

A 26th dynasty necropolis was also found, along with human skeletons.

Eldamaty added that all the objects found in this area will be restored so that they can be displayed in a museum on Egyptian military history, which is set to be built in two years.

Egypt

 

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