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Almost 60 royal mummies discovered in Egypt's Valley of the Kings
Swiss archaeological mission finds cache of 18th dynasty royal mummies on Luxor's West Bank
Nevine El-Aref , Monday 28 Apr 2014
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mummy mask unearthed
A huge tomb discovered in the West Bank of the Nile Valley of the Kings in Luxor is seen in this undated Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities handout photo received April 28, 2014 (Photo: Courtesy of Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities)

A cache of royal mummies has been unearthed inside a rock-hewn tomb in the Valley of the Kings on Luxor's West Bank, Egypt's antiquities ministry announced on Monday.

The tomb contains almost 60 ancient Egyptian royal mummies from the 18th dynasty along with the remains of wooden sarcophagi and cartonnage mummy masks depicting the facial features of the deceased, Antiquities Minister Mohamed Ibrahim told Ahram Online.

Ibrahim explained that the excavation work was carried out in collaboration with Basel University in Switzerland.

Early studies reveal that the Heratic texts engraved on some of the clay pots found inside the tomb identify the names and titles of 30 deceased, among them the names of princesses mentioned for the first time – Ta-Im-Wag-Is and Neferonebo.

Anthropological studies and scientific examination of the found clay fragments will be carried out to identify all the mummies and determine the tomb's owner and his respective mummy, said Ali El-Asfar, head of the ministry's ancient Egyptian antiquities section.

The head of the Swiss archaeological mission – Swiss Egyptologist Elena Paulin – said that among the finds were well-preserved mummies of infant children as well as a large collection of funerary objects.  

 

She said that remains of wooden sarcophagi were also unearthed, proving that the tomb was reused by priests as a cemetery.

Early examinations of the tomb reveal that it has been subjected to theft several times since antiquity, said Ballin.

 





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Ni'Cois Smith
30-05-2014 03:30am
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oklaafrican
Find dem
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Debra Aston
21-05-2014 04:57pm
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My Children Thank You
Because of the study of the ancients many things have been learned. The finding of the Dead Sea Scrolls, to Christians, gained much credibility for New Testament Bibles translation. When my children and I studied Egypt's past, especially the information about the Early and Middle Kingdom, that past flowered before their eyes and mine, also. While it seems grisly to dig through graves how can we can learn the good as well as the bad. Maybe your idea of closing up the graves is good for respectful reasons, but will it allow future Egyptians to know their past? If so then it will also help future Egyptians to better the future.
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kay starr
09-05-2014 06:35pm
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egyptian history
I have no problem with Egyptians studying their ancient ancestors. When we die our spirits no longer have need of our mortal remains...we no longer reside in them....And to share past history and traditions of a Country like Egypt is a beautiful experience....
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William Blakely
29-04-2014 06:01am
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Proof of cemetry?
Could someone please explain why "remains of wooden sarcophagi ..." ... "proving that the tomb was reused by priests as a cemetery." Why does this discovery lead to that conclusion?
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Glen Parry
29-04-2014 05:36pm
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Texts & styles
As with anything else, Ancient Egyptian coffins evolved stylistically over the millennia and it is quite possible for the excavation team to date coffins on the basis of form, colour and decoration; often down to a limited period within a given dynasty. The texts on the coffin fragments themselves will normally contain references to the deceased person's name and titles. Virtually all of the tombs within the Kings' Valley were later used for such intrusive burials.
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Aladdin, Egypt
28-04-2014 10:40pm
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Grave Diggers
Enough is enough. Our ancestors intended to rest in peace not for tourist to look at them. Shame on for not having respect to dead. Take picture and close down the grave again.
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Debra Aston
01-05-2014 05:19pm
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A moments thought.
Sir, I must respectfully ask your forbearance of the intrusive nature of archaelogy.
000000
30-04-2014 02:40pm
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make ancestor protection group
merumori
30-04-2014 02:20pm
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agree
"Enough is enough. Our ancestors intended to rest in peace not for tourist to look at them. Shame on for not having respect to dead. Take picture and close down the grave again."
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Roland
28-04-2014 10:01pm
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Which tomb
Has anyone found out if this was found in an existing known tomb or found in a completely new tomb?
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Glen Parry
29-04-2014 09:11pm
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Known but not Known
Apparently the tomb itself, KV40, was known to exist but had not been officially entered, as opposed to being raided by robbers or for interring intrusive burials, in modern times. Certainly, this is the first time the tomb has been properly excavated (NB. although the Theban Mapping Project's map of the valley shows the location of the tomb, they were unable to gain entry and draw up it's plan.)
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Glen Parry
28-04-2014 06:05pm
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WOW!
What an amazing discovery. Yet again, those who have stated, in the past, that the Kings' Valley is exhausted have been proved spectacularly wrong. My congratulations to all involved; even if it will mean KV34 remaining off limits when I return to Luxor, this summer.
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Aly Sadek -CANADA
28-04-2014 11:11pm
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Egypt..
..When I return to Luxor, this summer.....GLEN....YOU'RE ALWAYS WELCOMED...THANKS

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