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Giza Plateau to be revamped, with peddlers removed, horse rides regulated

First phase of a new rehabilitation project will regulate the price of horse and camel rides and place souvenir peddlers in a designated area

Nevine El-Aref , Tuesday 24 Jun 2014
El-Damaty at the plateau
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Views: 5084

A plan to restore Giza Plateau after three years of neglect since Egypt's 2011 uprising is set to kick off within two weeks, says the antiquities ministry.

A ministerial committee comprised of antiquities and heritage minister Mamdouh El-Damaty, tourism minister Hisham Zaazou and Giza governor Ali-Abdel Rahman has toured the site several times to gauge its condition and has decided to launch the first phase of the rehabilitation process.

These first steps include repaving all the roads within the grounds as well as installing signs to direct visitors and provide information about the sites. Other signs will be installed to inform tourists of the official ticket prices and the costs of activities like horse and camel riding.

Tourists have long complained over the pushy nature of touts offering horse and camel rides on the grounds, especially since there are no fixed prices – a problem that the signs should fix, said El-Damaty, the antiquities minister.

Peddlers – another source of harassment – will be placed in a designated zone outside the archaeological site at the Mena House Hotel, at the plateau's entrance.

Other plans for the first phase include a parking lot and erecting a large wall to enclose the plateau. The sound and light show will also be revamped and operating again.

The ministry is in the process of coming up with the required budget to complete a planned visitors centre at the plateau, said El-Damaty.

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5



Jon Stevens
02-08-2014 04:43pm
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Mean house
I'm sure the guests and management of the Mena House will not be too pleased that the pedlars are going to be relocated next to their hotel
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ayman
26-06-2014 10:51am
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Good work
Keep it up. Our sites deserve to be spent on much more and operated much more professionally. Any goods or services offered should be done in a specific place, organized, regulated and held to very high standards since tourism is a very sensitive market. Other countries have much less to see and get cared for and spent on much more and in return bring back greater revenues! We know the right thing to do, no more excuses for not doing it.
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Karren B
25-06-2014 12:20am
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102+
Bring on the changes
Although a marvellous site in Egypt, the sheer aggressiveness of the pedlars and the shocking way they treat their animals prevents my enjoyment of this place. Hopefully the changes will be in place by my visit next February, or I will give it a miss.
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Sam Enslow
24-06-2014 09:30pm
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Great News
Money spent on television and other promotions is wasted for now. Work to make archaeological sites tourist friendly and viewing them a pleasant experience will enhance the tourist's enjoyment of Egypt and turn each tourist into the best advertiser for Egypt. Tourists always complain about not being able to enjoy sites because of the constant hustles and cheating. Fair and honest treatment of visitors will mean they will spend more money and be happy to do it. Once a tourist feels cheated, his money stays in his pocket. I would add that more needs to be done to encourage people to people contacts between tourists and Egyptians (non commercial). Egyptians can be very nice people, but visitors meet only the hustlers. I hope the work at Giza is expanded to include all archaeological sites. Such activities will increase local profits and the visitor's experience.
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medo
24-06-2014 06:47pm
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108+
great!
Bravo!! This president and his government have done more in days than the last one did in a year!! Dealing with criminals, enforcing the laws of the roads.. great job!
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