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Friday, 15 December 2017

Tomb of Amun gate's guard uncovered in Luxor

A painted tomb of the guard of god Amun’s gate uncovered in Luxor

Nevine El-Aref , Tuesday 3 Mar 2015
The entrance of the side hall
The entrance of the side hall
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An 18th dynasty tomb belonging to the guard of the ancient god Amun’s gate, Amenhotep, has been discovered in Gorna on Luxor’s west bank.

The tomb was uncovered by an archaeological mission of the American Research Centre in Cairo during excavation work carried out in the Gorna necropolis.

Minister of Antiquities Mamdoud Eldamaty told Ahram Online on Tuesday that the tomb is a T-shaped tomb with two large halls and an unfinished small niche at its end. An entrance leading to a side room with a shaft at its middle is found at the tomb’s southern side. “Such a shaft could lead to the burial chamber,” Eldamaty pointed out.

He went on saying that the tomb’s walls are painted with scenes depicting the tomb’s owner and his wife in front of an offering table. Hunting scenes are also decorating a part of the walls.

The tomb
The tomb's large hall

Soltan Eid, director of Upper Egypt Antiquities, explained that the tomb was subjected to deterioration and looting in antiquity as some parts of the decoration scenes and hieroglyphic texts are erased as well as the name of god Amun. Such action, asserted Eid, indicates that the tomb was deteriorated during the religious revolution led by monotheistic king Akhenaten who united all ancient Egyptian gods into one called Aten.

The tomb will be subjected to restoration in order to open it to visitors.

A painted wall depicting a cultivation scene
A painted wall depicting a cultivation scene

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William
22-03-2015 01:16am
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Ancient Egyptians
Excellent to see the depiction of the original Egyptians (Africans) who history, culture and contributions to civilization are often buried in tombs of revisionist history. But these tombs don't lie, painted by the people themselves. They and Herodutus knew precisely what they looked like.
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Janet
11-03-2015 03:19am
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Media Trumps Truth
Don McLean, one of my friends, a co-founder of Goddesschess, passed away in October 2012. He always stressed to me that it was the "media" of the time that we rely upon in our modern-day research, and that it was no different then than it is today, except the media of the ancient Egyptians was in stone and ceramics and tomb paintings. He was so right -- I can see it happening today, but our media is much more fleeting and what is here today, is gone tomorrow. Who knows what people will think of us 2000 years from now... Reality is often quite different from the truth at any given time -- I see this demonstrated daily in my own life as big-moneyed interests concentrate their resources to undermine American democracy. We need to learn to be much more flexible in our views of "what it was like back then," for we actually know very little of what actually happened then in the greater scheme of things. Remember this - as Don McLean told me - the victors write the history.
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Karen Collins
04-03-2015 12:15am
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wonder
I have often wondered what Akhnaton wanted to do that the established religion refused to do. Kings don't charge religions unless there is something the crown wants something done and the priests refuse.what was the big schism between the crown and priests?
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Aris
10-03-2015 12:59am
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Source
Akhenaten was a highly misunderstood king. His intention was not to promote monotheism to the ancient egyptians, but rather to teach them self enlightenment. That is why the Aten was shownn in hieroglyphs as the Light, --the Sun. But it was not the Sun, like Ra. It was simply, enlightenment. He wanted Egypt to become greater than it has ever known, as so he knew that it was not just physically to be great, but spiritually as well. But the people were not ready for such a paradigm shift. Therefore, he decided to show the people that they did not need their god's for enlightenment, and took down the statues, writings, --anything linked to worship of other God's to prove that Egypt would still be great and flourish. Making Aten a "God", seemed to be the only way he could get through to the people as an example. But they only looked at him as a tyrant, even though he gave them everything tehy could need. The high preists didnt like this though, and wanted to keep their control of the peopl
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expat
03-03-2015 07:41pm
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just realise,what this nation was capable off once...
and at a time,when nobody else was living in other things than huts and today? in the kings town of luxor,they cannot build a tarmac road,which is not deteroating in a two years span they cannot fix easy things as to discipline folks like the caleshe tribe,they are actually frightened to execute the laws.. they cannot bring the knowledge,that overpopulation is a guaranty for starvation in future,to the huts,where the modern egyptians live hell,i would like to have the pharaos back here :) but maybe,they were just expats from germany with some esoteric touch?
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Aladdin, Alex
03-03-2015 01:33pm
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Great
It shows many, good things in the social fabric of Egypt. The discovery of the fort in Sinai is equally important. Keep the good works.
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