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Saturday, 25 May 2019

A part of Tutmosis Karnak column arrives home from London

A part of a column that was stolen from Tutmosis hall at Karnak Temple arrived in Egypt today from London

Nevine El-Aref , Sunday 5 Jul 2015
karnak
the recovered piece
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In collaboration with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Egypt's embassy in London, the Ministry of Antiquities succeeded to recover a piece of a column that was stolen and illegally smuggled out of the country many years ago.

Ali Ahmed, head of the Antiquities Repatriation Department, told Ahram Online that the returned piece is carved of sandstone and engraved with a scene depicting the god Amun Re. It was a part of a column found at Tutmosis hall at Karnak Temple on Luxor's east bank.

The piece was in the gallery of Karnak that was subjected to looting in the aftermath of January 2011 revolution.

The piece is registered in the Ministry of Antiquities official documents and dates back to the 18th dynasty. It is 36cm wide and 29cm tall.

Minister of Antiquities Mamdouh Eldamaty explained that the piece was in the possession in a British citizen who bought it from the market without knowing that it was a stolen piece. Upon his knowledge, the British citizen agreed to return the piece back to Egypt.

The piece is to be sent to the restoration lab of the Egyptian museum for inspection and restoration before returning it to its original position in Karnak.

 

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3



Allen
05-07-2015 06:48pm
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14+
These stolen artifacts were stollen by locals, for personal profit.
Who in turn SOLD it to foreigners. Much like what ISIS is doing in Iraq and Syria. Looting and destroying history and culture openly. So let's set the record set clear, as to where the crime is taking place locally.
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Glen Parry
05-07-2015 06:00pm
0-
10+
Circumstances are Important
Whilst largely agreeing in with your post in general, I would argue that, if, as the main article states, this particular piece was stolen & sold to a private collector, in the period following the January 25 Revolution, then it is only fitting that it be returned.
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Aladdin, Alex
05-07-2015 03:50pm
17-
1+
Bad Act
Demanding the return of our antiquities is wrong public relation and loss of free advertisement. Our antiquities overseas are safer and well protected. Can you imagine when foreign children and students see the antiquities what they will do when they grow up.? Beside, these are reward early European explorers who spend money, time and even their life to discover our treasures. Shame on us, we are programmed to do the wrong decisions because of our ignorance.
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