Last Update 21:53
Wednesday, 22 November 2017

Statues discovered in Amenhotep III temple on Luxor's west bank

A collection of statues depicting the lion goddess Sekhmet was unearthed in the ruins of King Amenhotep III’s funerary temple on Luxor’s west bank

Nevine El-Aref , Tuesday 15 Mar 2016
luxor
Sekhmet in situ
Share/Bookmark
Views: 5948
Share/Bookmark
Views: 5948

A European excavation team working on the funerary temple of King Amenhotep III discovered a set of statues depicting the lioness goddess of war Sekhmet and a partial statue of King Amenhotep III.

Minister of Antiquities Mamdouh Eldamaty told Ahram Online that the newly discovered statues are to be put on display within two months at their original location in the temple after the completion of a wall now under construction around the structure.

luxor
Statue of goddess sekhmet sitting on the throne

Mahmoud Afifi, head of the ancient Egyptian antiquities department, explains that three of the statues are complete figures depicting the goddess Sekhmet sitting on a throne and holding in her right hand the ankh symbol of life.

Another of the statues depicts Sekhmet standing and holding the papyri slogan in her left hand, with a fifth statue depicting a standing King Amenhotep III wearing the official suit of his jubilee.

luxor
Torso of goddess sekhmet

Sourouzian pointed out that during the last excavation season the mission unearthed a collection artefacts of the goddess Sekhmet wearing the triode wig and a long tide dress.

luxor
goddess Sekhmet

Short link:

 

Email
 
Name
 
Comment's
Title
 
Comment
Ahram Online welcomes readers' comments on all issues covered by the site, along with any criticisms and/or corrections. Readers are asked to limit their feedback to a maximum of 1000 characters (roughly 200 words). All comments/criticisms will, however, be subject to the following code
  • We will not publish comments which contain rude or abusive language, libelous statements, slander and personal attacks against any person/s.
  • We will not publish comments which contain racist remarks or any kind of racial or religious incitement against any group of people, in Egypt or outside it.
  • We welcome criticism of our reports and articles but we will not publish personal attacks, slander or fabrications directed against our reporters and contributing writers.
  • We reserve the right to correct, when at all possible, obvious errors in spelling and grammar. However, due to time and staffing constraints such corrections will not be made across the board or on a regular basis.
1



Glen Parry
15-03-2016 07:45pm
0-
4+
Who'd Have Thought It?
Congratulations to all concerned on this marvellous news. Who would have thought, even 10 years ago, that a site which was written off as only having the Memnon Colossi for a point of interest would be producing such a stream of wonderful statuary and evidence for the building itself? All the more reason for those contemplating a visit to Egypt, and Luxor in particular, to do so; whether it be a first time visit or one of many revisits. Though, when taken in conjunction with the excavation an restoration being carried out by the Spanish team, at Thothmoses III's Mortuary Temple, one is left wondering just how much more, modern re-excavation of the other Theban West Bank temples might reveal?
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
Latest

© 2010 Ahram Online.