Last Update 9:9
Egypt's King Khufu's harbour in Suez discovered
French-Egyptian archaeological mission discover the oldest commercial harbour from fourth dynasty Egyptian King Khufu at Wadi Al-Jarf area, 180 km south of Suez
Nevine El-Aref , Thursday 11 Apr 2013
Share/Bookmark
Views: 9876


one of the papyri
a newly discovered cave

On the Red Sea shore at Wadi Al-Jarf area along the Suez-Zaafarana road, a French-Egyptian archaeological mission from the French Institute for Archaeological Studies (IFAO) stumbled upon what it believed to be the most ancient harbour ever found in Egypt.

The harbour goes back to the reign of the fourth dynasty King Khufu, the owner of the Great Pyramid in Giza Plateau. The harbour is considered one of the most important commercial harbours where trading trips to export copper and other minerals from Sinai were launched.

A collection of vessel anchors carved in stone was also discovered as well as the harbours different docks.

Minister of State for Antiquities Mohamed Ibrahim announced that a collection of 40 papyri, showing details of daily life of ancient Egyptians during the 27th year of King Khufu’s reign, was also unearthed during excavation work carried out.

“These are the oldest papyri ever found in Egypt,” asserted Ibrahim.

He also stated that these papyri are very important because it reveals more information on the ancient Egyptians’ daily life, as it includes monthly reports of the number of labours working in the harbour and details of their lives.

The papyri have been transferred to the Suez Museum for study and documentation.

French Egyptologist Pierre Tallet, director of the archaeological mission, pointed out that it is very important to carefully study the information in these papyri because it will introduce plenty of information about this period. The papyri will also show the nature of life that the ancient Egyptians once lived, their rights and duties, which we know little about, Tallet added.

The mission has also succeeded in discovering remains of workers’ houses, which reveals the importance of this harbour and area commercially whether among the different cities of Egypt or abroad, said Adel Hussein, head of the Ancient Egyptian Sector at the Ministry of State for Antiquities.

A collection of 30 caves were also discovered along with the stone blocks used to block their entrances, inscribed with King Khufu’s cartouche written in red ink. Ship ropes and stone tools used to cut ropes and wooden remains were discovered as well.





Short link:

 

Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
Ahram Online welcomes readers' comments on all issues covered by the site, along with any criticisms and/or corrections. Readers are asked to limit their feedback to a maximum of 4000 characters (roughly 200 words). All comments/criticisms will, however, be subject to the following code
  • We will not publish comments which contain rude or abusive language, libelous statements, slander and personal attacks against any person/s.
  • We will not publish comments which contain racist remarks or any kind of racial or religious incitement against any group of people, in Egypt or outside it.
  • We welcome criticism of our reports and articles but we will not publish personal attacks, slander or fabrications directed against our reporters and contributing writers.
  • We reserve the right to correct, when at all possible, obvious errors in spelling and grammar. However, due to time and staffing constraints such corrections will not be made across the board or on a regular basis.
6



Tyler
01-07-2013 02:27am
0-
1+
Thanks.
Thanks for this it really helped me out with my project, please contact me back so we can chat ( :D I can rhyme )
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
5



Marilyn Docherty
17-04-2013 07:54am
0-
1+
Amazing News
How exciting! I have always been fascinated by the history of Ancient Egypt and am constantly on the search for stories about new finds. Have visited Egypt on two occasions and seeing the beauty of some of the Temples and other ruins I am always in awe when something new is found beneath the sand and wonder how much more is yet to be discovered and what new tales these discoveries will unfold. The advance and interlect of the Ancient Egyptians astounds me. I often think that so called 'modern civilization' is actually regressing. Thank you for this enlightening news!!
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
4



Marilyn Docherty
17-04-2013 07:52am
0-
0+
Amazing News
How exciting! I have always been fascinated by the history of Ancient Egypt and am constantly on the search for stories about new finds. Have visited Egypt on two occasions and seeing the beauty of some of the Temples and other ruins I am always in awe when something new is found beneath the sand and wonder how much more is yet to be discovered and what new tales these discoveries will unfold. The advance and interlect of the Ancient Egyptians astounds me. I often think that so called 'modern civilization' is actually regressing. Thank you for this enlightening news!!
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
3



Garry
12-04-2013 10:54am
0-
3+
Missionary
Dear Sir I have some questions on the port site of Wadi Jarf. 1) Sir Wilkerson said the jars found in the galleries were used for the ashes of cremated remains, he thought from the Greeks, You made no mention of this? 2)Why do you believe the jars were for water and food storage? 3) The date from the jars was from the 4th Dynasty, How did you get this date? 4) Have you tested the wood and cloth found at the site using Carbon 14? This would appear to be the easiest and most accurate date to get? Thank you in advance for any help on this! Garry
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
2



karima
12-04-2013 10:18am
0-
1+
AWESOME!
I cant wait for more details about this...
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
1



Roslyn
11-04-2013 10:11pm
0-
0+
Marvellous discovery!
This is a simply marvellous discovery, hoping this will help boost the tourism at least with those interested in ancient Egypt, of which there are many, wondering how long it will take to unveil this site.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment

© 2010 Ahram Online. Advertising