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Skeleton from 5th ancient Egyptian dynasty found in Abusir
A well preserved skeleton of a top governmental official from the fifth dynasty unearthed in Abusir, an archeological site near Cairo
Nevine El-Aref , Monday 24 Mar 2014
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A skeleton of a top ancient Egyptian official unearthed in Abusir (Photo: the Supreme Council of Antiquities)

A Czech archaeological team working on a site in Abusir on Monday unearthed the skeleton of a top governmental official, referred to as Nefer during studies carried out in his tomb after it was discovered last year.

Nefer held several titles in the royal palace and the government during the reign of the fifth dynasty king, Nefereer-Ka-Re. He was the priest of the king's funerary complex, the supervisor of the royal documents scribes and also of the house of gold.

Egypt's antiquities minister Mohamed Ibrahim said that the skeleton was found inside the deceased's sarcophagus, which was carved in limestone. A stone head rest was found under the skeleton's head.

Ali El-Asfar, head of the ministry's ancient Egyptian antiquities section, told Ahram Online that the tomb – discovered last year by the Czech mission led by Mirislav Barta – is an unfinished rock-hewn tomb within a funerary complex and consists of four corridors, with the eastern one devoted to Nefer and the other three for his family members.

Also found were five burial wells and a limestone false door engraved with the deceased's different titles.

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Lucile myers
14-04-2014 12:08pm
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Fantastic!
This is an exciting discovery not only for Egypt and the world but also for budding Egyptologists like myself who are interested in the discovery of new pieces of evidence related to the funerary practices of the ancient Egyptians, particularly those of high court officials
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Rob Wilson
04-04-2014 04:39pm
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excavations
This is a wonderfull find & may more great discovries be uncovered
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