Last Update 20:13
Saturday, 15 December 2018
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PHOTO GALLERY: Something Else - Off Biennale visual art exhibition


Something Else - Off Biennale
(Photo: Soha Elsirgany
Something Else - Off Biennale
(Photo: Soha Elsirgany
Something Else - Off Biennale
(Photo: Soha Elsirgany
Something Else - Off Biennale
(Photo: Soha Elsirgany
Something Else - Off Biennale
(Photo: Soha Elsirgany
Something Else - Off Biennale
(Photo: Soha Elsirgany
Something Else - Off Biennale
(Photo: Soha Elsirgany
Something Else - Off Biennale
(Photo: Soha Elsirgany
Something Else - Off Biennale
(Photo: Soha Elsirgany
Something Else - Off Biennale
(Photo: Soha Elsirgany
Something Else - Off Biennale
(Photo: Soha Elsirgany
Something Else - Off Biennale
(Photo: Soha Elsirgany
Something Else - Off Biennale
(Photo: Soha Elsirgany
Something Else - Off Biennale
(Photo: Soha Elsirgany
Something Else - Off Biennale
(Photo: Soha Elsirgany
Something Else - Off Biennale
(Photo: Soha Elsirgany
Something Else - Off Biennale
(Photo: Soha Elsirgany
Something Else - Off Biennale
(Photo: Soha Elsirgany
Something Else - Off Biennale
(Photo: Soha Elsirgany
Dec
6

Something Else - Off Biennale, the largest event dedicated to contemporray art in Cairo, continues to run at several venues untill its closing on 15 December.

Artworks by over 100 Egyptian and international artists are distributed between Darb 1718, two different spaces on Huda Sharaawy street, a space on Abdelkhalek Tharwat, in addition to a store spot near Townhouse gallery.

The diverse works all find ways to respond to this year’s theme that asks, “What if it did not happen?” in an exhibition curated by Simon Nijami, with artistic director Moataz Nasr, founder of Darb 1718.

The different venues frame the works in unique ways. For instance the open spaces of Darb allow for the different pieces to be in conversation as they are viewed in parallel.

Meanwhile the multiple rooms at Nabarawy street offer artists more private spaces to showcase projects separate, and make for a less overwhelming experience for the viewer.

While there are artists who were selected individually, and other who worked under the direction of a curator, the display is democratic and does not highlight the difference. Some curators however, such as Power Ekroth and Sara Rossling,  have chosen to display the works of their artists in a choesive manner, and highlight that in their display.

The exhibition runs alongside a programme of events that includes talks, workshops, performances and film screenings.

Al-Ahram Weekly and Ahram Online are official media sponsors of Something Else.

For more arts and culture news and updates, follow Ahram Online Arts and Culture on Twitter at @AhramOnlineArts and on Facebook at Ahram Online: Arts & Culture

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