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Thursday, 20 June 2019
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PHOTO GALLERY : Indian Hindu pilgrims take a holy dip at the holy Sangam


AFP
Indian Hindu pilgrims arrive to take a holy dip at the holy Sangam -- the confluence of the Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati rivers -- during the auspicious bathing day of Makar Sankranti at the Kumbh Mela in Allahabad, on January 15, 2019.
AFP
Followers of the Kinnar Akhara monastic Hindu order made up of transgender members take a dip in the Sangam -- the confluence of the Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati rivers -- during the auspicious bathing day of Makar Sankranti at the Kumbh Mela in Allahabad on January 15, 2019.
AFP
A Hindu pilgrim dries his clothes after taking a dip in the waters of Pushkar lake during the auspicious bathing day of Makar Sankranti in Pushkar, in the Indian state of Rajasthan on January 15, 2019
AFP
Followers of the Kinnar Akhara monastic Hindu order made up of transgender members take a dip in the Sangam -- the confluence of the Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati rivers -- during the auspicious bathing day of Makar Sankranti at the Kumbh Mela in Allahabad on January 15, 2019.
AFP
Followers of the Kinnar Akhara monastic Hindu order made up of transgender members ride on a chariot in a procession towards Sangam -- the confluence of the Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati rivers -- during the auspicious bathing day of Makar Sankranti at the Kumbh Mela in Allahabad on January 15, 2019.
AFP
Followers of the Kinnar Akhara monastic Hindu order made up of transgender members ride on a chariot in a procession towards Sangam -- the confluence of the Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati rivers -- during the auspicious bathing day of Makar Sankranti at the Kumbh Mela in Allahabad on January 15, 2019.
AFP
Laxmi Narayan Tripathi (C), a transgender rights activist and chief of the Kinnar Akhara monastic Hindu order made up of transgender members, rides on a chariot with other members in a procession towards Sangam -- the confluence of the Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati rivers -- during the auspicious bathing day of Makar Sankranti at the Kumbh Mela in Allahabad on January 15, 2019.
AFP
Indian Naga sadhus (Hindu holy men) return after taking a dip at the holy Sangam -- the confluence of the Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati rivers -- during the auspicious bathing day of Makar Sankranti at the Kumbh Mela in Allahabad, on January 15, 2019
AFP
Indian sadhus (Hindu holy women) take a dip into the water of the holy Sangam -- the confluence of the Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati rivers -- during the auspicious bathing day of Makar Sankranti at the Kumbh Mela in Allahabad, on January 15, 2019.
AFP
A Hindu devotee offers prayerd after taking dip in the waters of the Narmada river on the occasion of Makar Sankranti Festival, in the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh on January 15, 2019
AFP
Indian sadhus (Hindu holy men) put ash on themselves after taking a holy dip at Sangam -- the confluence of the Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati rivers -- during the auspicious bathing day of Makar Sankranti at the Kumbh Mela in Allahabad, on January 15, 2019.
Jan
15

Indian Hindu pilgrims arrive to take a holy dip at the holy Sangam -- the confluence of the Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati rivers -- during the auspicious bathing day of Makar Sankranti at the Kumbh Mela in Allahabad, on January 15, 2019. - State authorities in Uttar Pradesh are expecting 12 million visitors to descend on Allahabad for the centuries-old festival, which officially begins on January 15 and continues until early March

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