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PHOTO GALLERY: Islamic State group destroys heritage in Syria


Syria
This undated file photo released Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015 on a social media site used by Islamic State militants, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, shows smoke from the detonation of the 2,000-year-old temple of Baalshamin in Syria's ancient caravan city of Palmyra (AP)
Syria
A general view shows the temple of Baal Shamin in the historical city of Palmyra, Syria October 22, 2009. Islamic State's demolition of an renowned ancient Roman temple in the Syrian city of Palmyra is a war crime that targeted an historic symbol of the country's diversity, the U.N. cultural agency UNESCO said on August 24, 2015 (Reuters )
Syria
The Baal Shamin Temple (C) in Palmyra, Syria, is pictured in this June 26, 2015 handout satellite image by the U.S. Department of State made available August 29, 2015(Reuters)
Syria
FILE - This undated file photo released Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015 on a social media site used by Islamic State militants, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, shows the demolished 2,000-year-old temple of Baalshamin in Syria (AP)
Syria
Tourists view the Temple of Bel in the historical city of Palmyra, Syria April 18, 2008. The hardline Islamic State group has destroyed part of an ancient temple in Syria (Reuters)
Syria
A view shows the sign of the temple of Baal Shamin in the historical city of Palmyra, Syria October 26, 2009. Islamic State's demolition of an renowned ancient Roman temple in the Syrian city of Palmyra is a war crime that targeted an historic symbol of the country's diversity, the U.N. cultural agency UNESCO said on August 24, 2015. (Reuters)
Syria
This file photo released on Sunday, May 17, 2015, by the Syrian official news agency SANA, shows the general view of the ancient Roman city of Palmyra, northeast of Damascus, Syria (AP)
Syria
A general view shows the temple of Baal Shamin in the historical city of Palmyra, Syria October 26, 2009. Islamic State's demolition of an renowned ancient Roman temple in the Syrian city of Palmyra is a war crime that targeted an historic symbol of the country's diversity, the U.N. cultural agency UNESCO said on August 24, 2015 (Reuters)
Syria
A general view shows the Temple of Bel in the historical city of Palmyra, Syria April 18, 2008. Picture taken April 18, 2008. (Reuters)
Syria
In this file photo released on Sunday, May 17, 2015, by the Syrian official news agency SANA, shows the general view of the ancient Roman city of Palmyra, northeast of Damascus, Syria (AP)
Syria
This undated photo released Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015 on a social media site used by Islamic State militants, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, shows the 2,000-year-old temple of Baalshamin in Syria (AP)
Syria
This undated photo released Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015 on a social media site used by Islamic State militants, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, shows shows explosives in the 2,000-year-old temple of Baalshamin in Syria (AP)
Syria
FILE - This undated file photo released Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015 on a social media site used by Islamic State militants, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, shows shows militants laying explosives in the 2,000-year-old temple of Baalshamin in Syria (AP)
Aug
31

The nearly 2,000-year-old temple of Baalshamin in Syria's ancient caravan city of Palmyra was the latest victim in the Islamic State group’s campaign of destruction of historic sites across territory it controls in Iraq and Syria

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