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Saturday, 07 December 2019
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PHOTO GALLERY: Saudi women vote for first time


Saudi Arabia
A man casts his vote at a polling station during the Saudi municipal elections. (Reuters)
Saudi Arabia
A Saudi woman casts her ballot. (AFP)
Saudi Arabia
Saudi women vote at a polling centre during the country's municipal elections. AP)
Saudi Arabia
Saudi men prepare to vote at a polling station. (AFP)
Saudi Arabia
Saudi men vote at a polling station in the capital Riyadh. (AFP)
Saudi Arabia
Saudi election officials sit at a polling station in the Saudi capital Riyadh. (AFP)
Saudi Arabia
Saudi women prepare to vote at a polling centre during the country's municipal elections in Riyadh. (AP)
Saudi Arabia
A Saudi woman leaves a polling station after casting her vote during municipal elections. (Reuters)
Saudi Arabia
Saudi women voters outside a polling station. (Reuters)
Saudi Arabia
A woman leaves a polling station after casting her vote during municipal elections, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia December 12, 2015 (Reuters)
Saudi Arabia
Saudi women vote at a polling station. (AP)
Saudi Arabia
Saudi women voters. (AP)
Dec
12

Saudi women are taking part in the municipal elections both as voters and candidates for the first time

Thousands of Saudi women are heading to polling stations across the kingdom on Saturday to participate in elections for the first time, both as voters and candidates.

Nearly 6,000 men and around 980 women are standing as candidates for local municipal council seats. More than 130,000 women have registered to vote, compared to 1.35 million men.

The country's General Election Commission says there are at least 5 million eligible voters in a population of 20 million, but the figure could be much higher.

The participation of women in Saudi elections is a step forward for women's rights, but is still not enough, rights activists say.  

Analysts have pointed out that in the context of Saudi Arabia’s male guardianship system a number of issues need to be addressed in order for this move to have a meaningful impact on women's lives. 

Read more here.

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