Last Update 21:38
Friday, 29 May 2020
Multimedia
PHOTO GALLERY: World starts celebrations for 2017


New Year
Fireworks explode over the Sydney Opera House during an early evening display in the lead up to the main New Year's Eve fireworks in Sydney, Australia, December 31, 2016. (Reuters)
New Year
Fireworks explode off Auckland's Sky Tower as the new year is welcomed to New Zealand, Jan 1, 2017. (AP)
New Year
Fireworks explode over the Sydney Opera House and Harbour Bridge as Australia ushers in the New Year in Sydney, January 1, 2017. (Reuters)
New Year
Fireworks explode over the Sydney Opera House and Harbour Bridge as Australia ushers in the New Year in Sydney, January 1, 2017. (Reuters)
New Year
Fireworks explode over the Sydney Opera House and Harbour Bridge as Australia ushers in the New Year in Sydney, January 1, 2017. (Reuters)
New Year
Fireworks explode over the Sydney Opera House and Harbour Bridge as Australia ushers in the New Year in Sydney, January 1, 2017. (Reuters)
New Year
Fireworks explode over the Sydney Opera House and Harbour Bridge as New Year's celebrations are underway in Sydney, Australia, Sunday, Jan. 1, 2017. (AP)
New Year
People buy round fruits as part of the preparations to welcome the New Year, Saturday, Dec. 31, 2016 in Manila, Philippines. Filipinos usually put at least twelve different round fruits that have the circular shape of coin money on their dinning table to symbolize prosperity for the coming New Year. (AP)
New Year
Balinese dancer prepare to perform during a New Year celebration in Denpasar, on Indonesia's resort island of Bali on December 31, 2016. ()
Various form of dances and music have made Bali's art and culture one of the most diverse in the world. (AFP)
Dec
31

Australia, New Zealand and other countries welcome 2017, which started in their part of the world

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