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Friday, 20 September 2019
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PHOTO GALLERY: Three generations of Iraqi winemakers


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Isaac, grandson of Gorgis, an Iraqi Christian wine maker, pours grape juice into a pail where it is kept for 4 days after being filtered and before fermenting for 40 days in Dhiha village near Duhok, Iraq September 7, 2018 REUTERS
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Red grapes are seen before getting squeezed and filtered then fermented for 40 days in Dhiha village near Duhok, Iraq September 11, 2018. REUTERS
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Gorgis, an Iraqi Christian wine maker, fills bottles with red wine, after it was filtered and before it ferments for 40 days in Dhiha village near Duhok, Iraq September 11, 2018. Picture taken September 11, 2018. (REUTERS)
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Gorgis, an Iraqi Christian wine maker, pours grapes into a squeezing machine in Dhiha village near Duhok, Iraq September 11, 2018. Picture taken September 11, 2018. REUTERS
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An Iraqi Christian man drinks red wine at sunset at Zawa mountain near Duhok, September 17, 2018. Picutre taken September 17, 2018. REUTERS
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Isaac, the grandson of Gorgis, an Iraqi Christian wine maker, closes bottles of wine after they were filtered and before they ferment for 40 days in Dhiha village near Duhok, Iraq September 11, 2018. Picture taken September 11, 2018. REUTERS
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Gorgis, an Iraqi Christian wine maker, and Isaac, his grandson, filter grape juice before leaving it to ferment for 40 days in Dhiha village near Duhok, Iraq September 7, 2018. Picture taken September 7, 2018. REUTERS
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Gorgis, an Iraqi Christian wine maker, squeezes grapes with his hands before leaving it to ferment for 40 days in Dhiha Village near Duhok, Iraq September 11, 2018. Picture taken September 11, 2018. REUTERS
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Gorgis, an Iraqi Christian wine maker, uses a grape squeezing machine invented by his son to squeeze grapes before filtering them and leaving them to ferment for 40 days in Dhiha village near Duhok, Iraq September 11, 2018 REUTERS
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Bottles of red wine are displayed after it was filtered and before it ferments for 40 days in Dhiha village near Duhok, Iraq September 11, 2018. Picture taken September 11, 2018. REUTERS
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For three generations, the Moshi family has been making wine in the basement of their rural home in the village of Yehhda near the Iraqi border with Turkey.

Gorgis Isaac Moshi, 70, is the latest to take charge. He began making red and white wine 60 years ago with his father and grandfather, harvesting and cleaning grapes before crushing them by hand or foot with other members of the family.

Moshi has revolutionised the small-scale operation, buying a press to crush the grapes and starting to sell his wine to his friends and neighbours in his small, remote Christian village in Amadiya district, northern Iraq. He also provides wine for the local churches.

"We started to sell only 10 years ago when we saw a demand for the drink we make," he said. "We sell 500 to 1,000 bottles a year."

A bottle costs 5,000 Iraqi dinars ($4.20), with the red wine in high demand, he said.

Gorgis' three sons, who helped him collect the latest harvest, are ready to take over whenever he decides to retire.

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