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Youssef Rakha's Articles
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@Sultans Seal wallows in his lack of democratic mettle

Youssef Rakha explores some of the issues informing the highly anticipated 30 June anti-government protests

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At a recent family gathering, someone happened to mention the case of Albert Saber: the 25-year-old proponent of atheism who had been tried and convicted for online “defamation of religion”

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On the "civil" community's recent clashes with Islamists

Distracted from political realities, Egyptians gather around their TV screens to watch Ramadan serials, but the view of society that the television projects back is a distorted one

Mohab Nasr, Ya rabb, a'tina kutuban linaqra' (Please, God, give us books to read), Cairo: Al Ain, 2012

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Does the Islamists' catch phrase mean what it says?

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It's always great to be proactive - but is it really?

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Who's best - the Spare Tyre, the Retired Terrorist, George W., or Cigar Bey? Egypt's presidential candidates fail to inspire

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At about five am this morning (2 May),I woke up to news of people being murdered in and around the site of the Abbassiya (Ministry of Defence) sit-in (#MOF on Twitter, ongoing since late Friday, 27 April)

In an unprecedented development, comedy superstar Adel Imam is facing a possible three-month prison sentence for alleged "contempt of religion" in several of his films.

Pacing up and down the arena of cyber-politics, in search of the Islamist homunculus secretly ensconced in the minds of liberals who covet a role in history more than anything history might actually give

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On the first anniversary of the initial referendum on constitutional amendments, Youssef Rakha remembers his father

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Atrocious, appalling, unbelievably ugly, writes Youssef Rakha. But the political antics of Tawfik Okasha, owner and director of Al Fara'een satellite channel, has implications for Egyptian society

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The only eyes worth publishing for are those of the anonymous reader somewhere for whom the struggle to understand the world through words still has meaning

The elections, like Tahrir, reflect the conflicting composition of Egyptian society and its reaction to social change


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Some time in February, the literary (and intellectual) Generation of the Nineties started coming up in intellectual conversations about the Arab Spring

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Anis Mansour, who died last week, came to represent the Egyptian State's elevation of men who could speak for power, rather than truth to it

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